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Children's Health Matters

Children's Health Matters is a column that shares the latest reporting, research, commentary and ideas on pediatric health and child development; prevention models to reduce health disparities for ill children and children born into poverty; links between maternal and children’s health; and broader trends in children's health and well-being.

Picture of Christopher Meyers
Journalists should strive for absolute clarity in language choice. Avoid ambigious phrases such as, “Dead but on life support.”
Picture of Debra Krol
“I have bad news for you,” my editor said during a phone call in late August 2017. “We’re closing in two weeks.”
Picture of Doug Strane
An undercount of kids in the 2020 census would have big implications for the safety net programs millions of children rely on.
Picture of Lauren  Whaley
A new study looking at survival rates of black, Hispanic and white children finds that racial disparities for some cancers can actually be explained by socioeconomic status.
Picture of Kellie  Schmitt
The challenge for journalists covering the country’s unchanged perinatal mortality rate is to go beyond the hospital setting, says Boston University's Eugene Declercq.
Picture of Anna Maria Barry-Jester
A family with a young child in Los Angeles found dangerous levels of lead in their rental. But they haven't been able to find another home in the region's extremely tight housing market.
Picture of Laura Ferguson
Decades of research have underscored the health benefits of breastfeeding for mothers and babies. You wouldn't know that from recent U.S. moves at the World Health Assembly.
By Laura Ferguson
Following a story in The New York Times last week, there has been widespread news coverage of actions by American officials to undermine a resolution on breastfeeding at the recent World Health Assembly, held at the United Nations in Geneva in May. News stories highlighted that U.S. officials threat
Picture of Teresa Sforza
Parental drug use is now responsible for one-third of the children in foster care. A reporting team will explore what happens to babies and parents caught in addiction's grip.
Picture of Ed Williams
In states such as New Mexico, many kids are put into treatment foster care who should never be there. The programs, run by private companies, vary widely in quality and safety from state to state.

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