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Children's Health Matters

Children's Health Matters is a column that shares the latest reporting, research, commentary and ideas on pediatric health and child development; prevention models to reduce health disparities for ill children and children born into poverty; links between maternal and children’s health; and broader trends in children's health and well-being.

Picture of Priska Neely
I remember the first time I heard about black infant mortality disparities. I was at a conference last summer on perinatal health and there was one presentation focused on the topic. The chilling statistic was uttered over and over again: black infants in the United States are twice as likely to die
Picture of Diana Barnes
The idea that moms who take the lives of their children deserve nothing less than a lifetime of incarceration ignores what we now know about maternal mental health, writes expert Diana Barnes.
Picture of Ryan White
At Los Angeles Unified's 15 wellness centers and through in-class screenings, the district is stepping efforts to help students cope with extremely high levels of trauma and toxic stress.
Picture of Samantha Caiola
Dealing with students’ childhood trauma may improve classroom behavior and attendance rates — at least that’s the idea at the Los Angeles Unified School District’s wellness centers.
Picture of Ryan White
Kathleen McGrory of the Tampa Bay Times on how she overcame tough obstacles to report on the rising trend of children being shot and killed in Florida.
Picture of Monica McLemore
There is nothing inherent about black skin that increases risks during pregnancy — except over-exposure to the real culprit, racism, which can harm a mother’s body in real, measurable ways.
Picture of Lauren Weber
The critical importance of nutrition during the first 1,000 days of a child's life is now recognized in feeding guidelines around the world. Why hasn't the U.S. gotten the memo?
Picture of John Gonzales
In California, Alameda County’s success in saving lives has not been replicated statewide — and an already appalling gap between white and black infant death has grown since then.
Picture of Lauren  Whaley
Whether it's screening for developmental problems or catching adverse childhood experiences early, some doctors want to make the pediatrician's office a one-stop shop.
Picture of Chinyere Amobi
When Jessica Porten sought help for postpartum depression, she wasn't expecting the nurse to call the police to escort her to the ER. She now believes moms need far better help for their mental health needs.

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