Skip to main content.

Children's Health Matters

Children's Health Matters is a column that shares the latest reporting, research, commentary and ideas on pediatric health and child development; prevention models to reduce health disparities for ill children and children born into poverty; links between maternal and children’s health; and broader trends in children's health and well-being.

Picture of Ryan White
Can games with prizes and incentives get kids moving more? Two programs in the U.S. and U.K. show early promise.
Picture of Kellie  Schmitt
A former journalist and single mother of two fears that changes to the Affordable Care Act could eliminate the coverage her family depends on to manage their complex health needs.
Picture of Ryan White
Can the styles of humor used by middle schoolers provide a window into their mental well-being? The research provides some intriguing early clues.
Picture of Ryan White
The number of babies born with opioids in their system has risen dramatically in recent years. That's particularly worrying in light of new research that found such children perform significantly worse in school than their peers.
Picture of Ryan White
It's been a disheartening week for proponents of evidence-based medicine and childhood vaccines. But to the media's credit, reporters haven't let fringe theories and pseudo-science go unchallenged.
Picture of Ryan White
The share of children who are uninsured has reached a historic low of less than 5 percent. That's projected to change if the Affordable Care Act is repealed and the Medicaid expansion reversed.
Picture of Ryan White
New research based on a long-term study of New Zealanders finds that risk factors at age 3 reliably predict later-in-life convictions, hospitalizations and fatherless families.
Picture of Ryan White
The U.S. is the only industrialized country without a paid family leave law. Trump has said he wants to change that. But will he?
Picture of Ryan White
With the news of President-elect Donald Trump’s picks for two big health-policy positions, we now have a few more tea leaves by which to ponder the future of Medicaid and the Children’s Health Insurance Program.
Picture of Ryan White
A new study shows the gains made in getting kids to the doctor since the turn of the millennium, and clarifies what’s at stake should public coverage programs undergo significant cutbacks.

Pages

CONNECT WITH THE COMMUNITY

Follow Us

Facebook


Twitter

CHJ Icon
ReportingHealth