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Children's Health Matters

Children's Health Matters is a column that shares the latest reporting, research, commentary and ideas on pediatric health and child development; prevention models to reduce health disparities for ill children and children born into poverty; links between maternal and children’s health; and broader trends in children's health and well-being.

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A new report gives a fresh look at how much care privately insured kids are using and how much it costs. While kids aren't using more care, the care they're receiving is getting more expensive.

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This week, California officially begins enrolling eligible undocumented kids in the state's Medicaid program. Here are a few things to keep an eye out for as the enrollment effort gets going.

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Researchers published a study this week that describes an uptick in reports of playground brain injuries. Although the increase was negligible, much of the media coverage failed to put the risks in context.

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There has been a bevy of headlines on child obesity this week, triggered by a new study casting doubt on earlier reports of drops in early childhood obesity rates. But real story is rather more complicated than the headlines suggest.

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California has the worst air in the nation. Yet in the Los Angeles region, home to some of the country’s foulest air, kids are now breathing considerably easier. Wait — how does that work?

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Just before President Obama announced a new set of new initiatives to boost access to addiction treatment this week, a four-part series on NPR looked at the opioid epidemic's smallest victims, and what can be done to improve their care.

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Upwards of two-thirds of uninsured kids in the U.S. are eligible for Medicaid or CHIP, but aren’t enrolled. New research suggests parent mentors could be a highly effective solution to getting more low-income kids insured, with potentially huge cost savings.

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How tightly does childhood adversity correlate with later-in-life measures of well-being? A new study looks at public school kids who grew up in some of Chicago's poorest neighborhoods and finds some disheartening patterns.

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When it comes to a hospitalized child, it’s fair to say no one is keeping tabs more closely than the mom or dad perched bedside. It’s no surprise they’re often to the first to catch medical errors, as new research suggests.

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This week brought news of a compromise in the battle over new school lunch standards. It comes quick on the heels of new research that questions critics' claims of tossed food and lost revenues.

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