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The Health Divide

The Health Divide explores the ways in which persistent disparities and inequities shape health in this country, with a focus on the role played by social factors outside of the doctor’s office. We look at the conditions where people live and work, and the influence of race, class and immigration status. We look at the health care policy landscape and efforts to close the gap between the haves and have nots when it comes to inequitable access and treatment in health care. The Health Divide explores the role of systemic racism and police violence as well as community safety and how such conditions can contribute to toxic stress and illness. Such factors can have an outsize role in determining individual and community well-being, influencing how long we live and the quality of our lives. We highlight great work around these themes in the journalism and policy sphere, and encourage our readers to weigh in with ideas.

Picture of Candace Y.A. Montague
COVID-19 has stolen attention from the addiction crisis — and made it worse
Picture of Candace Y.A. Montague
Are new policies from the nation’s largest group of physicians on race a game changer — or too little too late?
Picture of Niharika Sathe
A doctor who cares for underserved patients finds her efforts are often rendered useless by systemic barriers to care.
Picture of Joaqlin Estus
Tribes are finding strength and solutions in culture and tradition amid the devastation of COVID-19.
Picture of Nicole Karlis
Hard-earned tips on how to stay nimble when current events supplant your grand reporting plans.
Picture of Joana Ramos
Too many hospitals and clinics buck legal requirements to serve patients in their languages. The failure to communicate can have deadly consequences.
Picture of Susan  Abram
Even when sick, immigrant workers often feel like they have no choice but to show up at the job — they have to work to survive.
Picture of Mary Lou Fulton
A scholar-activist explains how she forced the system to be more transparent and accountable.
Picture of Issac Bailey
"As a black man from the South, my body bears proof of white supremacy’s persistence and limitations," writes author and Center for Health Journalism Fellow Issac Bailey in his new book.
Picture of Monica McLemore
A focus on these three key areas could go a long way toward achieving health equity.

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The pandemic is far from over but crucial COVID-19 protections and benefits are gone. In our next webinar, we'll explore the end of renter protections, unemployment benefits and other emergency relief, and what it means for the nation’s pandemic recovery and the health and well-being of low-income people and their communities. Glean story ideas and crucial context. Sign-up here!

Are you passionate about helping journalists understand and illuminate the social factors that contribute to health and health disparities at a time when COVID-19 has highlighted the costs of such inequities? Looking to play a big role in shaping journalism today in the United States?  Apply now for one of our positions. 

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