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The Health Divide

The Health Divide explores the ways in which persistent disparities and inequities shape health in this country, with a focus on the role played by social factors outside of the doctor’s office. We look at the conditions where people live and work, and the influence of race, class and immigration status. We look at the health care policy landscape and efforts to close the gap between the haves and have nots when it comes to inequitable access and treatment in health care. The Health Divide explores the role of systemic racism and police violence as well as community safety and how such conditions can contribute to toxic stress and illness. Such factors can have an outsize role in determining individual and community well-being, influencing how long we live and the quality of our lives. We highlight great work around these themes in the journalism and policy sphere, and encourage our readers to weigh in with ideas.

Picture of Georges Benjamin
"I am often asked why public health should care about the role of the court and who sits on it. The answer is simple: Court rulings can support or overturn policies that dramatically affect the public’s health."
Picture of Anna Maria Barry-Jester
“We need to think of race as a proxy for racism, rather than race as a proxy for biology," says Drexel University's Michael Yudell.
Picture of Anna Maria Barry-Jester
Maps can spotlight striking geographical patterns in health and pinpoint the questions your reporting needs to answer.
Picture of Cary Aspinwall
Across the country, politicians, reform advocates and the bail industry are waiting to see what happens next.
Picture of John  Gonzales
“The best policy we can pursue is try to reduce access to firearms among people who are suicidal," one researcher says.
Picture of Karen Bouffard
Community outreach has been particularly powerful in curbing dramatic disparities in organ donation between white and black Americans.
Picture of Suzanne Bohan
The Neighborhood Atlas gives journalists an intriguing new tool to visualize how social advantages vary across cities and regions.
Picture of Kristen Consillio
The disaster has been made worse by the number of residents suffering from chronic illnesses and a shortage of doctors.
Picture of Anna Maria Barry-Jester
The Trump administration's recent efforts to shrink the social safety net will only make treating the real drivers of health harder.
Picture of Elizabeth Zach
A network of regional "task forces" is tackling the opioid problem throughout California, leading to a dramatic drop in overdoses in one rural mountain county.

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The pandemic is far from over but crucial COVID-19 protections and benefits are gone. In our next webinar, we'll explore the end of renter protections, unemployment benefits and other emergency relief, and what it means for the nation’s pandemic recovery and the health and well-being of low-income people and their communities. Glean story ideas and crucial context. Sign-up here!

Are you passionate about helping journalists understand and illuminate the social factors that contribute to health and health disparities at a time when COVID-19 has highlighted the costs of such inequities? Looking to play a big role in shaping journalism today in the United States?  Apply now for one of our positions. 

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