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Investigating Health

This column offers thoughtful commentary on untold and overlooked issues that are ripe for journalism and policy exploration and investigation. We highlight great investigative journalism coverage, talk to leading reporters and thinkers, share resources and datasets rich with untold stories, and discuss how to navigate the roadblocks confronted in hard-hitting investigations.

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Why did the Occupational Health Safety Network meet with such an abrupt demise?
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"How is it supposed to work?" Answer that question and you're better prepared to spot when things go wrong.
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"The problem was, I was being played," writes contributor Bill Heisel. "The giant petrochemical company, Arco, had the city of Butte and the state of Montana outmatched."
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Disinformation is always bad for democracy, but it is especially toxic during a pandemic.
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We’ve long given up the idea that justice is blind. We need to give up the idea that health care is blind, too....
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Now is the time to start building timelines and documenting how local governments are handling — or fumbling — the COVID-19 crisis.
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A simple jog turns into an anxious minefield in the absence of clear guidance on COVID-19 transmission.
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Health sciences are rooted in concepts that go back centuries, and some of those concepts were crafted with a racist lens, writes contributor William Heisel.
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Why we need to distinguish between bad behavior and structural problems in how we’re organized as a society.
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How do you cover the fake cures without giving them more oxygen than they deserve?

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Announcements

As public health officials like to say, "COVID-19 isn't done with us." And journalists know that we're not done with COVID-19. Apply now for five days of stimulating discussions on the pandemic's disproportionate impact on people of color -- plus reporting and engagement grants of $2k-$10k and five months of mentoring while you work on an ambitious project.

Are you passionate about helping journalists understand and illuminate the social factors that contribute to health and health disparities at a time when COVID-19 has highlighted the costs of such inequities? Looking to play a big role in shaping journalism today in the United States? The USC Center for Health Journalism seeks an enterprising and experienced journalism leader for our new position of “Manager of Projects.” 

 

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