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Investigating Health

This column offers thoughtful commentary on untold and overlooked issues that are ripe for journalism and policy exploration and investigation. We highlight great investigative journalism coverage, talk to leading reporters and thinkers, share resources and datasets rich with untold stories, and discuss how to navigate the roadblocks confronted in hard-hitting investigations.

Picture of William Heisel
There’s a rush to ban a dangerous ingredient in e-cigarettes. But people are missing the truly deadly ingredient in these electronic drug-delivery devices.
Picture of Kathleen McGrory
A report from The Morning Sun in Pittsburg, Kansas and GateHouse Media’s National Data and Investigations Team is a good reminder that there can be much more to these stories.
Picture of William Heisel
What stories are you ignoring? What stories might be consuming too much of your bandwidth? Are you spending too much time with one particular source? It's worth scrutinizing your inbox periodically.
Picture of William Heisel
As a reporter, you can do your part by both exposing the problems discovered by regulatory bodies and exposing the big gaps in the regulatory safety net.
Picture of Joe Rubin
An investigative reporter for Capital & Main shares how data, investigative smarts and stubborn persistence eventually culminated in new state legislation.
Picture of William Heisel
Why you should investigate the unequal implementation of the Americans with Disabilities Act, which turns 30 next year.
Picture of William Heisel
Nearly one out of every five kidneys donated in the United States ends up in the trash. At the same time, approximately 5,000 people die every year while waiting for a kidney.
Picture of Judith Garber
Hospitals should be able to tout their accomplishments, but doing it through sponsored news articles in The Boston Globe seems sneaky.
Picture of William Heisel
I first became interested in jail suicides when I was reporting on the state prison in Montana, where I found that murders were quite uncommon inside the prison — but suicides were not.
Picture of William Heisel
Your job when using someone as a source is to make sure you're letting your audience know everything about that source that is relevant to that story.

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As public health officials like to say, "COVID-19 isn't done with us." And journalists know that we're not done with COVID-19. Apply now for five days of stimulating discussions on the pandemic's disproportionate impact on people of color -- plus reporting and engagement grants of $2k-$10k and five months of mentoring while you work on an ambitious project.

Are you passionate about helping journalists understand and illuminate the social factors that contribute to health and health disparities at a time when COVID-19 has highlighted the costs of such inequities? Looking to play a big role in shaping journalism today in the United States? The USC Center for Health Journalism seeks an enterprising and experienced journalism leader for our new position of “Manager of Projects.” 

 

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