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Remaking Health Care

This column explores how health reform is changing the ways in which we pay for and deliver health care in the U.S. It also highlights the ways in which our current system is falling short on measures of coverage, access and affordability. On any given week, that could mean a look at how Republican plans to repeal Obamacare could reshape the individual insurance market, how the safety net system is adapting to new financial pressures, or how the trend of doctors and hospitals merging into ever-larger entities is driving up costs. We also explore health care costs and whether the Affordable Care Act or its successor plans can live up to the promise to rein them in. Throughout, we keep watch on how the goals of health reform intersect with the shaping power of markets and human behavior. Contributors include veteran health journalist Trudy Lieberman and independent health journalist Kellie Schmitt, with occasional contributions from independent journalists such as Susan Abram and Sara Stewart.

Picture of Trudy  Lieberman
If it took this long to fix this financially punishing legislative "typo," what does that portend for larger health policy aspirations?
Picture of Trudy  Lieberman
The private market has failed to deliver affordable long-term care insurance. Washington state has another plan.
Picture of Trudy  Lieberman
Is the government serious about attacking super-high drug prices by paying only for those with proven benefit for patients? The Aduhelm decision will be a critical tell.
Picture of Lindsey Ellefson
New York City bets on this controversial model. More communities may soon follow.
Picture of Kellie  Schmitt
The state is on the cusp of becoming the first to offer all residents health care coverage, regardless of their immigration status.
Picture of Madeleine Tibaldi
While the country awaits a Supreme Court ruling on Roe v. Wade, state lawmakers are busy chipping away at access to care.
Picture of Trudy  Lieberman
Sustained coverage on surprise bills fueled public outrage and legislation. But the resulting regulations are far from perfect.
Picture of Trudy  Lieberman
A trio of reporters offer a masterful examination of the overuse, underuse and misuse of medical care in America.
Picture of Trudy  Lieberman
Comparing Medicare plans proves tough sledding — even for a veteran journalist tracking such plans for decades.
Picture of Trudy  Lieberman
Why Medicare advocates worry deeply about any moves that erode the program’s universal reach among seniors.

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