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Remaking Health Care

This column explores how health reform is changing the ways in which we pay for and deliver health care in the U.S. It also highlights the ways in which our current system is falling short on measures of coverage, access and affordability. On any given week, that could mean a look at how Republican plans to repeal Obamacare could reshape the individual insurance market, how the safety net system is adapting to new financial pressures, or how the trend of doctors and hospitals merging into ever-larger entities is driving up costs. We also explore health care costs and whether the Affordable Care Act or its successor plans can live up to the promise to rein them in. Throughout, we keep watch on how the goals of health reform intersect with the shaping power of markets and human behavior. Contributors include veteran health journalist Trudy Lieberman and independent health journalist Kellie Schmitt, with occasional contributions from independent journalists such as Susan Abram and Sara Stewart.

Picture of Trudy  Lieberman
As Americans warm to the idea of a greater role for the government in health care, there's a difference between saying that everyone is entitled to health insurance and a plan to make that possible.
Picture of Trudy  Lieberman
Suggestions of health insurance policies with skimpy benefits and higher out-of-pocket costs might reduce part of the health insurance cost equation, but is that the kind of insurance system Americans really want?
Picture of Kellie  Schmitt
Instead of strictly asking about medical providers, Dr. David Carlisle, an expert on health disparities, urges reporters to examine the availability and diversity of dentists, psychologists, pharmacists and optometrists in their community.
Picture of Trudy  Lieberman
The U.S. needs to seriously examine what the national health systems of peer countries like France, Germany, and the U.K. do best and make those ideas work here.
Picture of Kellie  Schmitt
As the country faces the possibility of massive Medicaid cuts, a pair of experts and an ace Medicaid reporter offered tips on how to navigate the fast-developing story in our latest Health Matters webinar.
Picture of Louise McCarthy
The growth of Los Angeles’ safety net has been dramatic since the Affordable Care Act took effect. Now clinics are anxiously wondering if the many changes they've made can be sustained if the ACA is repealed.
Picture of Kellie  Schmitt
“I do think you should take the arguments in favor of work requirements seriously,” Vox's Dylan Scott advised. “But also, of course, look at them with a skeptical eye.”
Picture of Kellie  Schmitt
The United States’ health care system came in dead last in a comparison of 11 wealthy countries, done by The Commonwealth Fund.
Picture of Trudy  Lieberman
A Florida woman's story illuminates the perils of creating a two-tier health insurance market, as Texas Sen. Ted Cruz is calling for. The bad old days of health insurance could fast become the bad new days.
Picture of Joachim Hero
New research finds that just before the ACA took effect, the U.S. had some of the biggest disparities in people’s perceptions of their own health and health care out of 32 countries sampled.

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U.S. children and teens have struggled with increasing rates of depression, anxiety and suicidal behavior for much of the past decade. Join us as we explore the systemic causes and policy failures that have accelerated the crisis and its inequitable impact, as well as promising community-driven approaches and evidence-based practices. The webinar will provide fresh ideas for reporting on the mental health of youth and investigating the systems and services. Sign-up here!

The USC Center for Health Journalism at the Annenberg School for Communication and Journalism is seeking two Engagement Editors and a social media consultant to join its team. Learn more about the positions and apply.

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