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Remaking Health Care

This column explores how health reform is changing the ways in which we pay for and deliver health care in the U.S. It also highlights the ways in which our current system is falling short on measures of coverage, access and affordability. On any given week, that could mean a look at how Republican plans to repeal Obamacare could reshape the individual insurance market, how the safety net system is adapting to new financial pressures, or how the trend of doctors and hospitals merging into ever-larger entities is driving up costs. We also explore health care costs and whether the Affordable Care Act or its successor plans can live up to the promise to rein them in. Throughout, we keep watch on how the goals of health reform intersect with the shaping power of markets and human behavior. Contributors include veteran health journalist Trudy Lieberman and independent health journalist Kellie Schmitt, with occasional contributions from independent journalists such as Susan Abram and Sara Stewart.

Picture of Kellie  Schmitt
For many with pre-existing conditions, the prospect of an ACA repeal evokes fear of a return to high-risk pools. This is one in a series of four perspectives on the impact of Obamacare.
Picture of David Lansky
Amid talk of ACA repeal, the signs suggest that the new Congress and president will diminish the emphasis on value-based health care. Here's what reporters should keep in mind.
Picture of Kimberli  Markowicz
Lack of affordability and choice make Obamacare a nonstarter for one family. This is one is a series of four perspectives on the impact of Obamacare.
Picture of Kellie  Schmitt
Coverage gained under the ACA allowed one writer to start transitioning. This is one in a series of four perspectives on the impact of Obamacare.
Picture of Trudy  Lieberman
The failures of the national conversation during the run-up to Obamacare's passage are now hastening its demise, with too few Americans seeing firsthand benefits.
Picture of Kellie  Schmitt
A new study finds that patients at in-network hospitals received "surprise" bills from out-of-network doctors 22% of the time. In this Q&A, author Zack Cooper explains the study and what might be done to stop such surprises.
Picture of Trudy  Lieberman
Trump's election victory has spurred new fears of changes to Medicare. But the move to privatize Medicare has been underway for decades, with Medicare Advantage representing the movement's most recent guise.
Picture of David Lansky
Rewarding physicians and hospitals for the value of care can dramatically improve care quality and lower costs. So why has the transition to this new model of care been so slow?
Picture of Kellie  Schmitt
The editor-in-chief of Health Affairs shares his thoughts on what a Trump presidency will mean for health care, and how reporters can cover this huge, evolving story.
Picture of Trudy  Lieberman
Republicans, with their relentless insistence on repealing and replacing the ACA, have reframed the discussion of what’s politically possible to achieve in America at the moment.

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