Skip to main content.

Remaking Health Care

This column explores how health reform is changing the ways in which we pay for and deliver health care in the U.S. It also highlights the ways in which our current system is falling short on measures of coverage, access and affordability. On any given week, that could mean a look at how Republican plans to repeal Obamacare could reshape the individual insurance market, how the safety net system is adapting to new financial pressures, or how the trend of doctors and hospitals merging into ever-larger entities is driving up costs. We also explore health care costs and whether the Affordable Care Act or its successor plans can live up to the promise to rein them in. Throughout, we keep watch on how the goals of health reform intersect with the shaping power of markets and human behavior. Contributors include veteran health journalist Trudy Lieberman and independent health journalist Kellie Schmitt, with occasional contributions from independent journalists such as Susan Abram and Sara Stewart.

Picture of Trudy  Lieberman

Medicare wants to lower payments to doctors who prescribe more expensive drugs and give higher reimbursements to those who use more affordable ones. But the industry pushback has been fierce.

Picture of Kellie  Schmitt

A long-deferred attempt to reform mental health care advanced out a House committee this week. Here's a look at how the bill seeks to change "the nation's broken mental health system," and some of the coverage to date.

Picture of Trudy  Lieberman

If the government changes the rules of the game to satisfy sellers of Medicare Advantage plans that count on high star ratings for bonus payments, then what good are the ratings? The ratings are "a farce," one critic says.

Picture of Kellie  Schmitt

Inmates who cycle in and out of jail can drive up incarceration and health care costs, says researcher Shannon McConville. Can Medicaid make a meaningful difference?

Picture of Kellie  Schmitt

Our Remaking Health Care blog talks with Shannon McConville of the Public Policy Institute of California about how the health care safety net has fared under Obamacare, as well as other developments reporters should keep tabs on.

Picture of Trudy  Lieberman

As health costs keep rising and insurers recalibrate their Obamacare plans, House Speaker Paul Ryan has proposed creating separate risk pools to insure sick people and lower premiums.

Picture of Kellie  Schmitt

By aggressively documenting a patient’s conditions, insurers can inflate the amount of money they get from Medicare Advantage patients. Here's what reporters should understand about the hidden practice of "upcoding."

Picture of Trudy  Lieberman

Victims of the Affordable Care Act's "family glitch" include the Devors family of Salem, Ill., who now find themselves caught in a dire health crisis, without adequate coverage.

Picture of Gerald Kominski

So-called "surprise bills" can leave unsuspecting patients on the hook for thousands of dollars. And market solutions haven't fixed the problem so far, writes UCLA health policy expert Gerald Kominski.

Picture of Judy  Silber

Do undocumented residents have to pay the Obamacare penalty for not having health insurance? Despite advocates' efforts, you might be surprised at how much confusion there is — even from tax preparers.

Pages

Announcements

The USC Center for Health Journalism at the Annenberg School for Communication and Journalism is seeking two Engagement Editors to serve as thought leaders in one of the most innovative and rewarding arenas in journalism today – “engaged reporting” that puts the community at the center of the reporting process. Learn more about the positions and apply to join our team.

Nowhere was the massive COVID wave of winter 2021 more devastating than in America’s nursing homes, where 71,000 residents died in the surge. In this webinar, we’ll hear from the lead reporter in the USA Today series "Dying for Care," who will show how an original data analysis and an exhaustive reporting effort revealed a pattern of unnecessary deaths that compounded the pandemic’s brutal toll. Sign-up here!

CONNECT WITH THE COMMUNITY

Follow Us

Facebook


Twitter

CHJ Icon
ReportingHealth