Skip to main content.

Remaking Health Care

This column explores how health reform is changing the ways in which we pay for and deliver health care in the U.S. It also highlights the ways in which our current system is falling short on measures of coverage, access and affordability. On any given week, that could mean a look at how Republican plans to repeal Obamacare could reshape the individual insurance market, how the safety net system is adapting to new financial pressures, or how the trend of doctors and hospitals merging into ever-larger entities is driving up costs. We also explore health care costs and whether the Affordable Care Act or its successor plans can live up to the promise to rein them in. Throughout, we keep watch on how the goals of health reform intersect with the shaping power of markets and human behavior. Contributors include veteran health journalist Trudy Lieberman and independent health journalist Kellie Schmitt, with occasional contributions from independent journalists such as Susan Abram and Sara Stewart.

Picture of Laken Brooks
The law banned discrimination in health care. A young woman in Appalachia explains how these protections saved her life.
Picture of Gianetta Palmer
I finally got coverage under Obamacare and planned to catch up on tests and treatment. Then the pandemic struck.
Picture of Chandra Bozelko
As a condition of probation, thousands of people must comply with court orders to get mental health treatment. If they lose insurance, many could wind up behind bars without committing a crime.
Picture of Trudy  Lieberman
Where does this leave policy proposals like expanding ACA subsidies and creating a public option?
Picture of Kellie  Schmitt
While the cliffhanger presidential election took center stage Tuesday, voters also decided a host of health-related measures.
Picture of Trudy  Lieberman
What Donald Trump and Joe Biden have said about five important heath policy issues likely to be on the table in the next administration.
Picture of Kellie  Schmitt
Politico's Joanne Kenen and University of Michigan law professor Nicholas Bagley break down the case for us.
Picture of Trudy  Lieberman
The inequities in American health care laid bare by COVID-19 will become even more deeply entrenched if the nation's highest court scraps the landmark law.
Picture of Trudy  Lieberman
High drug prices are making for good politics. Americans keep waiting for that to translate into effective policies.
Picture of Trudy  Lieberman
“Medical loss ratios have dropped like a rock,” one former insurance executive said. But will that translate into any savings for Americans?

Pages

Announcements

The pandemic is far from over but crucial COVID-19 protections and benefits are gone. In our next webinar, we'll explore the end of renter protections, unemployment benefits and other emergency relief, and what it means for the nation’s pandemic recovery and the health and well-being of low-income people and their communities. Glean story ideas and crucial context. Sign-up here!

Are you passionate about helping journalists understand and illuminate the social factors that contribute to health and health disparities at a time when COVID-19 has highlighted the costs of such inequities? Looking to play a big role in shaping journalism today in the United States?  Apply now for one of our positions. 

CONNECT WITH THE COMMUNITY

Follow Us

Facebook


Twitter

CHJ Icon
ReportingHealth