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Remaking Health Care

This column explores how health reform is changing the ways in which we pay for and deliver health care in the U.S. It also highlights the ways in which our current system is falling short on measures of coverage, access and affordability. On any given week, that could mean a look at how Republican plans to repeal Obamacare could reshape the individual insurance market, how the safety net system is adapting to new financial pressures, or how the trend of doctors and hospitals merging into ever-larger entities is driving up costs. We also explore health care costs and whether the Affordable Care Act or its successor plans can live up to the promise to rein them in. Throughout, we keep watch on how the goals of health reform intersect with the shaping power of markets and human behavior. Contributors include veteran health journalist Trudy Lieberman and independent health journalist Kellie Schmitt, with occasional contributions from independent journalists such as Susan Abram and Sara Stewart.

Picture of Kellie  Schmitt
Health reporters from Politico and The Washington Post joined Urban's Linda Blumberg for a fresh look at the candidates' plans for health reform— and the very real challenges they'd face.
Picture of Kellie  Schmitt
The CDC called to tell local officials that a plane with Americans returning from the center of the coronavirus outbreak was set to land in 11 hours. A doctor leading the response shares what happened next.
Picture of Trudy  Lieberman
With crucial health insurance protections hanging in the balance, journalists need to be especially rigorous and well-informed on health care policy as the campaigns unfold.
Picture of Kellie  Schmitt
The California State Assembly recently passed AB 890, which would give “full practice authority” to nurse practitioners. But a California physicians group opposes the bill.
Picture of Trudy  Lieberman
The American College of Physicians is calling for either a single-payer system or a government-run public option. "This is huge!" according to contributor Trudy Lieberman.
Picture of Kellie  Schmitt
Simon Haeder has studied narrow health insurance networks for years, but it wasn’t until the professor's 4-year-old son cracked his tooth that he really appreciated the practical implications.
Picture of Trudy  Lieberman
Having health insurance is no guarantee American families won't suddenly find themselves financially underwater, as reporter Jacob Margolis recently discovered.
Picture of Trudy  Lieberman
How the media's relentless focus on potential problems and downsides to any more inclusive health system helps preserve the existing arrangement, which seems to profit everyone but patients.
Picture of Trudy  Lieberman
Medicare reporting, once a staple of health care journalism, has largely disappeared from health and political beats. Seniors are paying the price.
Picture of Trudy  Lieberman
There's an urgent need for better media stories that sort through the proposals and give basic descriptions of what the major plans to lower prices would do.

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The pandemic is far from over but crucial COVID-19 protections and benefits are gone. In our next webinar, we'll explore the end of renter protections, unemployment benefits and other emergency relief, and what it means for the nation’s pandemic recovery and the health and well-being of low-income people and their communities. Glean story ideas and crucial context. Sign-up here!

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