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What questions do you have about covering COVID-19? The Center for Health Journalism is answering questions on how reporters and newsrooms can respond during the pandemic.

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Reporters from around the country share their strategies.
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“In a weird and dark way, it’s a good time to be a health reporter," one freelancer said.
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How do you find COVID-related racial disparities at nursing homes? Start with these tips.
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This week's question: How can the media encourage people to get vaccinated, once a vaccine has been developed?
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“You can’t allow a lack of data to stop you from reporting," says Poynter's Al Tompkins. "Report what you don’t have and constantly pound on that.”
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“I don’t think it’s any different than any beat you’re covering,” says Tiney Ricciardi of The Denver Post. “Think about your audience and news they can use.”
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How can journalists report on how implicit bias is affecting the quality of health care in their area? We asked some experts for ideas.
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Experts explain how to put the inevitable rise in COVID-19 cases into context.
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“My major piece of advice to anyone encountering preliminary studies is to be skeptical,” said journalism professor Sharon Dunwoody.

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Announcements

As public health officials like to say, "COVID-19 isn't done with us." And journalists know that we're not done with COVID-19. Apply now for five days of stimulating discussions on the pandemic's disproportionate impact on people of color -- plus reporting and engagement grants of $2k-$10k and five months of mentoring while you work on an ambitious project.

Domestic violence affects tens of millions of Americans every year. Yet media outlets mostly treat incidents as "cops" items, if they cover them at all, as opposed to treating domestic violence as a public health problem. Our free two-day symposium will help journalists understand the root causes and promising prevention, intervention and treatment approaches.  Plus participants will be able to apply for grants to report California-focused projects.

Are you passionate about helping journalists understand and illuminate the social factors that contribute to health and health disparities at a time when COVID-19 has highlighted the costs of such inequities? Looking to play a big role in shaping journalism today in the United States? The USC Center for Health Journalism seeks an enterprising and experienced journalism leader for our new position of “Manager of Projects.” 

 

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