Skip to main content.

Doc Gurley's Urban Health Beat

Doctor-blogger Jan Gurley writes about practicing medicine on the margins of society, and what we can learn from it.

Picture of R. Jan Gurley

At a recent public health conference in San Francisco, health advocates warned that the war on tobacco is far from over. Here's the latest from the front lines.

Picture of R. Jan Gurley

What are the "unmentionables" in healthcare and technology? A public health doctor weighs in from this week's Health 2.0 conference.

Picture of R. Jan Gurley

Time and time again, needle exchange programs for drug addicts have been shown to reduce the spread of diseases like HIV/AIDS and hepatitis. So why is the federal government slashing their funding?

Picture of R. Jan Gurley

Can computer applications make people healthy (and companies profitable)?  The quest is on to develop a game-changer like Farmville.

Picture of R. Jan Gurley

A new start-up is mining the FDA's adverse event data for medications and finding potentially dangerous patterns that the regulatory agency hasn't addressed — but should.

Picture of R. Jan Gurley

Can you change healthcare in just 28 hours? Can a team of programmers save lives and change the world? Check out their worthy attempts from the Health 2.0 Code-a-thon.

Picture of R. Jan Gurley

Doc Gurley dives into spamming for a good cause: to improve public health. Here's what she learned.

Picture of R. Jan Gurley

The issue of homeless people drinking themselves to death on a sidewalk is one that unites and divides communities in unpredictable ways. Could a "wet house" be the answer in your city?

Picture of R. Jan Gurley

As patient satisfaction surveys become more important to how doctors get paid, Doc Gurley finds them to be easily gamed and lacking in statistical validity — creating problems for both doctors and their patients.

Picture of R. Jan Gurley

Who wants to take care of a patient who is statistically likely to rate you poorly when your payment for services is based on that same rating? Doc Gurley examines the role of race and racism in patient satisfaction ratings.

Pages

Announcements

As public health officials like to say, "COVID-19 isn't done with us." And journalists know that we're not done with COVID-19. Apply now for five days of stimulating discussions on the pandemic's disproportionate impact on people of color -- plus reporting and engagement grants of $2k-$10k and five months of mentoring while you work on an ambitious project.

Domestic violence affects tens of millions of Americans every year. Yet media outlets mostly treat incidents as "cops" items, if they cover them at all, as opposed to treating domestic violence as a public health problem. Our free two-day symposium will help journalists understand the root causes and promising prevention, intervention and treatment approaches.  Plus participants will be able to apply for grants to report California-focused projects.

Are you passionate about helping journalists understand and illuminate the social factors that contribute to health and health disparities at a time when COVID-19 has highlighted the costs of such inequities? Looking to play a big role in shaping journalism today in the United States? The USC Center for Health Journalism seeks an enterprising and experienced journalism leader for our new position of “Manager of Projects.” 

 

CONNECT WITH THE COMMUNITY

Follow Us

Facebook


Twitter

CHJ Icon
ReportingHealth