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Doc Gurley's Urban Health Beat

Doctor-blogger Jan Gurley writes about practicing medicine on the margins of society, and what we can learn from it.

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How many people leave our prisons with no fixed destination?  If only for public safety reasons, you might assume the correctional system would want to know.  You would be wrong.

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In California’s largest cities, one senses that the number of homeless people continues to grow, whatever the interventions to prevent it. But some of the more commonly cited reasons for that growth don't explain the whole story.

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We all live in fear of that moment of diagnosis. You know it's bad, and your brain flees, backing away into a deep, silent corner. Only the words incurable and cancer slither into the darkness where your thoughts are hiding. So what happens that night if you're homeless?

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Low trace levels of radioactive iodine-131 have been found in rain in Massachusetts. Now, as Doc Gurley r

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Once the Great Potassium Iodide panic began, most Americans received messages saying “Don't Panic” on Twitter, on Facebook, the Internet. And that was the responsible media thing to do, right? Here's what may be wrong with that approach, neurologically speaking.

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Doctor-blogger Jan Gurley introduces her new blog on covering health at the margins of society, muses about why she blogs, and how her doctor and journalist roles sometimes conflict.

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This month marks the sober anniversary of the police killing of George Floyd, which ignited global protests and renewed efforts to reform or dismantle policing. In our next webinar, we’ll examine the price society pays for a criminal-legal system that disproportionately arrests, punishes and kills Black people. And we’ll look at how reporters can best cover this evolving story in original and powerful ways. Sign-up here!

As public health officials like to say, "COVID-19 isn't done with us." And journalists know that we're not done with COVID-19. Apply now for five days of stimulating discussions on the pandemic's disproportionate impact on people of color -- plus reporting and engagement grants of $2k-$10k and five months of mentoring while you work on an ambitious project.

Are you passionate about helping journalists understand and illuminate the social factors that contribute to health and health disparities at a time when COVID-19 has highlighted the costs of such inequities? Looking to play a big role in shaping journalism today in the United States? The USC Center for Health Journalism seeks an enterprising and experienced journalism leader for our new position of “Manager of Projects.” 

 

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