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William Heisel's Antidote: Investigating Untold Health Stories

William Heisel, former investigative reporter for the Los Angeles Times, writes about investigative health reporting. He is currently the director of global engagement at the Institute for Health Metrics and Evaluation.

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In his farewell post for the Antidote blog, veteran health care journalist Bill Heisel urges fellow journalists to adopt a posture of humility in the face of the vast, complex field that is health and health care.
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In his first of two final posts for the Antidote blog, longtime contributing editor William Heisel reflects on how journalists can cultivate a more thoughtful relationship with their sources.
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In the gray market for human body parts, companies and body brokers keep adapting to a changing industry. Here are some key takeaways from a recent Reuters series for reporters seeking to cover the ghoulish business.
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The trade in human body parts in still rife with problems, 17 years after the Orange County Register detailed the horrors in "The Body Brokers" series. A new Reuters investigation provides a gruesome update.
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Psychiatrist Reinaldo de los Heros has had more lives than a cat. For years, he was allowed to continue practicing, even after the death of one of his patients. But recent actions by Maine's medical board suggest his luck may have finally run out.
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The simple act of putting the emphasis on the person and not on their health problem – be it a drug use disorder or something else – will have an impact on how you view the sources of your stories and how the story connects with your audience.
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Drug use, misuse and addiction are so embedded in our popular culture that we have grown accustomed to seeing, hearing or reading about every permutation of the experience.
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Recent stories from the New York Times and the Washington Post encapsulate why language choices are so important for responsible reporting on addiction.
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Now that President Trump has officially declared the opioid crisis a national emergency, data can inform how to properly tackle the problem, community by community.
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The California Supreme Court just armed would be challengers to the state’s prescription drug tracking system. And defanging the system would have an impact on patient safety.

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As public health officials like to say, "COVID-19 isn't done with us." And journalists know that we're not done with COVID-19. Apply now for five days of stimulating discussions on the pandemic's disproportionate impact on people of color -- plus reporting and engagement grants of $2k-$10k and five months of mentoring while you work on an ambitious project.

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