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The Associated Press

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Many people are aware of the cruel handling in commercial turkey operations but fewer people know about the food additives and fast-growth methods that put both turkeys and the people who eat them at risk.

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The label on the malaria drug, developed by the Walter Reed Army Institute of Research in the 1970s after another malaria drug used in Vietnam failed, warns of psychosis, hallucinations, delusions, paranoia, aggression, tremors, confusion, abnormal dreams and suicide. The drug still prescribed to US

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Connecting cell phones to cancer, HIV/AIDS at 30, hospital drug shortages and more in today's Daily Briefing.

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Why do Mexican-American schoolchildren in California have seven times more flame retardant in their systems than their peers in Mexico? Answers and more in our Daily Briefing.

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Medical pot purveyors can't escape the tax man, plus more from our Daily Briefing.

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Why do so many Americans think health reform has been repealed? Answers and more in our Daily Briefing.

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Here's a recap of the latest developments on the health reform front, along with some helpful resources and story ideas for your community.

March 21, 2010, 10 p.m. PST

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Here’s where you have to pity Dr. Conrad Murray, regardless of whether you think he’s guilty.

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Get tips on covering medical research stories from veteran AP reporter Lauran Neergaard.

 

Announcements

Domestic violence affects tens of millions of Americans every year. Yet media outlets mostly treat incidents as "cops" items, if they cover them at all, as opposed to treating domestic violence as a public health problem. Our free two-day symposium will help journalists understand the root causes and promising prevention, intervention and treatment approaches.  Plus participants will be able to apply for grants to report California-focused projects.

The pandemic has unleashed a tsunami of misinformation, lies and half-truths capable of proliferating faster than the virus itself. In our next webinar, we’ll delve into what one of our speakers has termed “the natural ecology of bullshit” — how to spot it, how it spreads, who is most impacted, and how to counter it. And we’ll discuss reporting examples, strategies and story ideas that incorporate these insights and effectively communicate to diverse audiences. Sign-up here!

Are you passionate about helping journalists understand and illuminate the social factors that contribute to health and health disparities at a time when COVID-19 has highlighted the costs of such inequities? Looking to play a big role in shaping journalism today in the United States? The USC Center for Health Journalism seeks an enterprising and experienced journalism leader for our new position of “Manager of Projects.” 

 

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