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The long held belief that we should not be allowed to buy or sell pieces of our own bodies is changing. What does that mean for the future of organ donation?

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The Los Angeles Times examines the apparent failure of the city's much-touted healthier school lunch program, which appears to be a "flop" with students. Journalist Lisa Aliferis says the program may be more successful than anyone realizes.

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Victims of bad physician behavior everywhere are rubbing their eyes in disbelief today after Dr. Conrad Murray's conviction in the death of Michael Jackson. Here are five lessons from the case for regulatory agencies, prosecutors, patient advocates and journalists.

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After scaring its own physicians and nurses into submission, the government of Bahrain now is targeting one of the world’s most revered humanitarian organizations: Doctors Without Borders/Médecins Sans Frontières (MSF).

Picture of Laura Newman

Millions of American women were put on hormone replacement therapy before science evaluated the benefits and harms. Will men over 45 try testosterone replacement therapy too? Aggressive marketing of testosterone is on the rise.

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Why are state medical boards disciplining doctors by sending them to work in prisons? Why are some prison doctors with troubled histories kept away from patients - yet still collect their salaries? Learn how to report on these issues in your community.

Picture of Angilee Shah

Global health journalist Sam Loewenberg is passionate about his work. But if you really want to get a rise out of him, ask him to talk about how media organizations treat freelance journalists trying to do serious journalism.  

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Should the California Medical Board make a public case for more money? Yes, William Heisel says, noting that it costs doctors more to protect the few bad doctors in their midst from punishment than it does to help maintain the state’s system of medical rules and guidelines.

Picture of William Heisel

Health reporters got an unusual amount of mileage out of a study that said that its chief finding was “of unknown clinical significance.” And when these same reporters put on their blogging hats, they went off-road entirely.

Picture of William Heisel

Andrew Wakefield — creator of one of the greatest scares in medical history — had many accomplices in misleading the world about a link between vaccines and autism. Many in the media helped him spread his intellectual poison. Celebrities rallied behind his fake cause. And the scientific community helped keep the hoax alive by citing his work as if it were legitimate.

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