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Picture of Emily Bader
The Sun Journal analyzed data from Maine Department of Health and Human Services reports on child welfare, including 18 years of annual child protective services reports and annual reports on Office of Child and Family Services staffing.
Picture of Emily Bader
Nikole Powell’s father developed an opioid use disorder after a work injury, a dependence that traumatized his family and eventually led to his incarceration and death. His daughter is trying to break the cycle.
Picture of Emily Bader
Twenty years after Purdue Pharma introduced its pain medication, OxyContin, Maine lawmakers passed a bill that significantly stemmed the flow of pain pills into the state.
Picture of Emily Bader
Like many patients prescribed opioids for chronic pain, Todd Papianou, a high school teacher from Rumford, knows the thin line between life-saving and life-destroying medication.
Picture of Lindsey Ellefson
New York City bets on this controversial model. More communities may soon follow.
Picture of Frank Main
That state’s new drug reform is keeping users out of jail — but getting them help for addictions has been elusive.
Picture of Will James
Sam Miller can help us understand how addiction and homelessness intersect because he’s lived them both. Plus he can make us laugh. He points to one reason he was able to overcome homelessness while many others get trapped.
Picture of Teresa Sforza
When horrific cases of child abuse make headlines, social workers are often painted as neglecting their duty. But is a system that protects parental rights and keeping families intact really to blame?
Picture of Alexandra Demetriou
Addiction experts are pushing health care professionals to reexamine the way they discuss opioid addiction with patients and change how the establishment trains young doctors.
Picture of Kellie  Schmitt
Only about 6 percent of medical practitioners have obtained a government waiver that allows them to prescribe a crucial drug for treating opioid addiction. Here's why that's a problem.

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