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addiction

Picture of Cary Aspinwall
In Oklahoma, ranked No. 1 for per capita female incarceration, kids were going missing from school because their mothers were locked up in county jail. "This was the most complicated story I’ve ever done," writes 2016 National Fellow Cary Aspinwall.
Picture of Leonardo Castaneda
Data journalist Leonardo Castaneda offers reporters a detailed tutorial on how to analyze — and then map — data from any county's medical examiner's office on opioid-related deaths.
Picture of Ed Williams
The story of heroin in New Mexico's Rio Arriba County had been told too many times by the national media, leaving residents wary. But no journalist had invested the time to tell the personal stories of the community.
Picture of William Heisel
The tendency to blame the patient in the wake of deaths or complications often serves to obscure mistakes made by health care providers.
Picture of Nick Welsh
Patrick Hickey walked in a while back, an explosion of erudite indignation.
Picture of Monya De
Whether it's Taco Bell’s Naked Chicken Chalupa or the Flamin' Hot Cheeto Bagel, media coverage of stunt foods “only normalizes extreme levels of salt and sugar in food and alters our taste buds to promote addiction,” argues Dr. Monya De.
Picture of William Heisel
Massachusetts started sending email warning alerts to drug prescribers in 2013. But while some measures of drug abuse dropped in the following years, it’s hard to give credit to the alerts.
Picture of William Heisel
Banks tend to be very good at alerting you to potential credit card fraud. Can drug tracking programs do as good a job at flagging risky prescription scenarios?
Picture of Ed Williams
If there’s any police department that understands what an opioid epidemic means for a community, it’s New Mexico's Española Police Department. Even the chief of police has had addiction struggles within his own family.
Picture of Ed Williams
Research shows early childhood education is one of the most effective ways to prevent drug use later in life. That’s especially important in New Mexico's Rio Arriba County, where an opioid epidemic has been raging for decades.

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