Skip to main content.

advocate

Picture of Carolyn Ewell

If a member of the House Science Committee can be so wrong on basic facts of biology, can I expect a traumatized woman in my exam room to have a clearer understanding of rape and pregnancy?

Picture of Yvonne LaRose

A frustration for the victim of domestic abuse is trying to come forward to report the harm and in turn being met with no response. Worse is no response and no protection. * * * "I'm tired of being used as a punching bag. I'm tired of being plied for this and that piece of information. I'm tired of

Picture of William Heisel

Doug Wojcieszak talks about why doctors should apologize — not clam up — over their medical errors, and why some patients criticize his Sorry Works! program.

Picture of Leiloni  De Gruy

Living with HIV or AIDS can be an unyielding source of stress that is not easily handled alone. It takes support, activism and a strong determination to not only survive, but thrive with a disease that takes a heavy mental, physical and emotional toll.

Picture of Rachel  Dovey

In wealthy Marin, opposition to low-income housing is high—and so are the numbers of the county's poor, aged and disabled who need it most

Picture of William Heisel

Efforts to change laws to encourage doctors to apologize for medical errors while avoiding lawsuits have sparked debate over whether patient safety will be compromised. Here's why.

Picture of Angilee Shah

This is the first time Holly Dolan is writing about health for general readers -- and while she does not know where it will lead, the learning experience and new connections in her community keep her going.

Picture of Barbara Feder Ostrov

Journalists and pundits alike speculated freely this week about how the Supreme Court will rule on health reform, based mostly on the justices' comments during oral arguments. Should they have?

Picture of Melissa Sweet

When the worlds of policy and research collide, great things can happen in public health. The trouble is, such productive collisions don't happen nearly enough, says Abby Haynes.

Pages

Announcements

This month marks the sober anniversary of the police killing of George Floyd, which ignited global protests and renewed efforts to reform or dismantle policing. In our next webinar, we’ll examine the price society pays for a criminal-legal system that disproportionately arrests, punishes and kills Black people. And we’ll look at how reporters can best cover this evolving story in original and powerful ways. Sign-up here!

As public health officials like to say, "COVID-19 isn't done with us." And journalists know that we're not done with COVID-19. Apply now for five days of stimulating discussions on the pandemic's disproportionate impact on people of color -- plus reporting and engagement grants of $2k-$10k and five months of mentoring while you work on an ambitious project.

Are you passionate about helping journalists understand and illuminate the social factors that contribute to health and health disparities at a time when COVID-19 has highlighted the costs of such inequities? Looking to play a big role in shaping journalism today in the United States? The USC Center for Health Journalism seeks an enterprising and experienced journalism leader for our new position of “Manager of Projects.” 

 

CONNECT WITH THE COMMUNITY

Follow Us

Facebook


Twitter

CHJ Icon
ReportingHealth