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Affordable Care Act

Picture of Soumya Karlamangla

For uninsured California immigrants, which side of a county line they live can significantly affect the care available when they're sick. And Obamacare reforms are complicating choices for local officials as they consider what, if any, healthcare should be provided for the remaining uninsured.

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Some state lawmakers are trying help Californians by expanding the number of Medi-Cal providers following the explosive growth of the state's health plan for the poor under the Affordable Care Act. California's Medicaid program now serves almost a third of the state's population.

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Using barbershops as channels for reaching black men with health information is a proven public health technique, one funded by government grants and charities in parts of North Carolina.

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Dr. Adam Zolotor thinks physicians should diagnose prostate cancer based on symptoms rather than screening. Here's why.

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"It's not your grandmother's Medi-Cal any more." California's version of Medicaid now provides health services for more than 12 million people, almost a third of all Californians. Medi-Cal insures more people than the populations of all but six states.

Picture of Kellie  Schmitt

Health insurers will often limit the size of provider networks to control costs, frustrating patients who suddenly find their doctor is now out-of-network. But do such "narrow networks" mean poorer quality care and access? Not necessarily, says a recent study of California plans.

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The Affordable Care Act has expanded health care access to millions of Americans, but also placed new demands on the health care delivery system. Here are five key trends that are helping bring more effective care to more patients in a post-reform world.

Picture of Daniel Chang

Why won’t Florida adopt Medicaid expansion? The Florida Senate has proposed a plan, but House leaders and Gov. Rick Scott oppose any Medicaid expansion because they say they don’t trust the federal government to keep its promise to pay for covering more Floridians.

Picture of Daniel Chang

Without Medicaid expansion, South Florida’s low-income residents have found out the hard way that the healthcare safety net designed to catch people before they hit bottom is no substitute for insurance.

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Miami-Dade County does not have the money to cover the potential loss of $200 million a year in federal funding that helps Jackson Health System, the county’s public hospital network, provide medical care for the uninsured and Medicaid patients, Mayor Carlos Gimenez said Tuesday.

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