Skip to main content.

Affordable housing

Picture of Lindsey Holden
San Luis Obispo County tenants are facing a “housing crisis point” as they struggle to find safe, affordable rentals and hold onto their homes amid the COVID-19 pandemic — and local advocates, attorneys and elected representatives are trying to find ways to help.
Picture of Lindsey Holden
The second story in The Tribune’s “Substandard of Living” series examining the experiences of low-income renters living in poorly maintained housing in San Luis Obispo County.
Picture of Nicole Hayden
The program sheltered thousands during the pandemic, but money — and time — is running out. Only 5% of clients have found a permanent home.
Picture of Lindsey Holden
Most San Luis Obispo County tenants struggle to afford their housing — and many likely live in units that are unhealthy because local governments don’t hold landlords accountable for renting old, crumbling homes and apartments.
Picture of Lindsey Holden
San Luis Obispo Tribune reporters Lindsey Holden and Cassandra Garibay joined Jose Guzman at KTAS Telemundo in Santa Maria to discuss their upcoming investigative series on substandard housing conditions in SLO county.
Picture of Barrington Salmon
My original premise was to look to see what if any negative effects gentrification had or has had on the lives, health, well-being and prospects of displaced residents in Washington, D.C.
Picture of Richard Lord
This story was produced as part of a larger project led by Rich Lord, a participant in the USC Center for Health Journalism's 2018 Data Fellowship.
Picture of Barrington Salmon
In the District of Columbia, a shortage of affordable housing, a hyper-expensive rental market and aging and vanishing housing stock has have tenants battling spiraling rents and housing costs, and have left them at increased risk of getting displaced.
Picture of Marina Riker
Little has been done to boost the number of affordable rental units since Harvey struck.
Picture of Emmanuel Felton
Famously troubled East St. Louis is embracing an idea known as “collective impact.” The idea is to better connect residents to existing services.

Pages

Announcements

This year saw a scorcher of a summer, the hottest on record. Worse, it could be the coldest summer we’ll see in our lifetimes. In this webinar, we’ll glean lessons and insights from a yearlong Los Angeles Times investigation into extreme heat. We’ll also identify gaps in state and federal tracking efforts, and outline policy changes that could help. Sign-up here!

The USC Center for Health Journalism's Impact Funds provide reporting support — funding and mentoring — to journalists who think big and want to make a difference. 

Apply today for our National Impact Fund for reporting on health equity and health systems across the country. 

Apply today for our California Impact Fund for reporting that brings untold stories to light in the Golden State. 

CONNECT WITH THE COMMUNITY

Follow Us

Facebook


Twitter

CHJ Icon
ReportingHealth