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Africa

Picture of Anna Clark

An American nonprofit is offering HIV-positive Kenyan women $40 to use IUDs as long-term birth control—and women are taking them up on it. Is this the right way to prevent the transmission of HIV to children?

Picture of Angilee Shah

I'll admit it: I am a South by Southwest newbie. But since the megaconference is expecting over 14,000 participants in the Interactive portion alone, I'm going to guess I won't be the only one. But I've done my homework, downloaded the (indispensible) mobile app, and scoured the schedule for new ideas in health. Here are the panels that caught my eye.

Picture of Sarah Arnquist

While speaking at the National Institutes of Health on Tuesday, USAID Administrator Rajiv Shah (left, photo source USAID) told the audience of scientists how the development agency would support the creation of new innovations and their delivery to improve the health of the world’s neediest popul

Picture of Noelle  Robbins

In an effort to promote awareness of the relationship between healthy forests, healthy people and healthy economies, The UN has declared 2011 the International Year of Forests. One overlooked reality links healthy forests, healthy people and improved global sanitation: the production and use of toilet paper, from forest to flush.

 

Picture of Dan Lee

Jody Ranck is an independent consultant and principal investigator at the Public Health Institute in Oakland, where he is helping create a new Public Health Innovation Center that will develop social media, mobile tools, and social innovation strategies to rethink public health practice. He is also a consultant with the UN Economic Commission for Africa and Stanford University School of Medicine, where he assists in creating new global health innovation and design programs.

Picture of Linda Marsa

Cook Stoves Save Lives: Why Hillary Clinton's new indoor stove initiative will help stop global warming

Last week, Secretary of State Hillary Clinton pledged $50 million in seed money to supply fuel efficient indoor stoves for women in Africa. When you think of the mega-billions that are spent on endless wars, it's refreshing to see that what the DOD would consider chump change is being earmarked for a worthy project that will save tens of millions of lives, improve the health of millions more—and drastically reduce greenhouse gas emissions.

Picture of Laura Starecheski

When someone living in New York's West African Communities shows signs of mental illness, friends and family don't send the individual to a doctor. The community gathers up enough money to send them to Africa for treatment. Laura Starecheski reports from New York.

Picture of Barbara Feder Ostrov

An infectious disease spread to humans by mosquitoes that have bitten infected birds, West Nile virus historically was seen only in Africa, Europe and Asia before it was first detected in the United States in 1999. Though the majority of those infected show no symptoms, the disease can be deadly, particularly in the elderly. If West Nile virus enters the brain, it can cause encephalitis or meningitis. The major way to prevent infection is to avoid mosquitoes and to reduce mosquitoes in populated areas. Updated June 2010

Picture of Rong  Xiaoqing

HIV/AIDS is an emerging public health problem in the Asian community in the United States. Rong Xiaoqing, a recipient of the Dennis A. Hunt Fund for Health Journalism, examines its impact for the Chinese-language publication Sing Tao Daily.

Part 2: Cultural tradition traps Chinese elder-abuse victims in U.S.

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