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Picture of Chloe Lee Rowlands
Many Bay Area seniors worry about how they can afford to live out their retirement years here — and they have reason for concern.
Picture of Chloe Lee Rowlands
Many seniors in the Bay Area are already struggling to make ends meet, and it’s about to get a whole lot worse.
Picture of Emily  DeRuy
Experts urge people to think now about the type of care they want in the future.
Picture of Emily  DeRuy
Emily DeRuy reported this story while participating in the USC Annenberg Center for Health Journalism’s 2021 California Fellowship. Other work by her includes: COVID forced Bay Area families to make agonizing elder-care decisions. Is there a fix? Getting older doesn’t have to be scary. Things to con
Picture of Susan  Abram
Friendship Line California relieves loneliness for older adults isolated at home. That makes it easier to stay there.
Picture of Brenda Gazzar
Some were more well-known to the public than others but ‘they were all well-known to us and loved by us,’ said Bob Beitcher, president and CEO of the Motion Picture and Television Fund.
Picture of Nicole Karlis
From extreme loneliness to heart problems to vision impairment, how does living without a home affect or contribute to these conditions as a person ages?
Picture of Laura Wenus
Stories of abuse or serious neglect in nursing homes make headlines, but patients and consumer advocates are trying to bring attention to overarching issues and push for a better system.
Picture of Laura Wenus
This story was produced as part of a larger project led by Laura Wenus, a participant in the 2019 California Fellowship, a program of USC Annenberg's Center for Health Journalism. Other stories in this series include: Nursing Care Expected To Worsen As California Ages Nursing Care Crunch Puts The On
Picture of Trudy  Lieberman
Reporters file the same stories about bad nursing homes year after year. Little changes. But what if we did more to help families find the right facilities in the first place?

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“Racism in medicine is a national emergency.” That’s how journalist Nicholas St. Fleur characterized the crisis facing American health care this spring, as his team at STAT embarked on “Color Code,” an eight-episode series exploring medical mistrust in communities of color across the country. In this webinar, we’ll take inspiration from their work to discuss strategies and examples for telling stories about inequities, disparities and racism in health care systems. Sign-up here!

The USC Center for Health Journalism at the Annenberg School for Communication and Journalism is seeking two Engagement Editors to serve as thought leaders in one of the most innovative and rewarding arenas in journalism today – “engaged reporting” that puts the community at the center of the reporting process. Learn more about the positions and apply to join our team. 

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