Skip to main content.

AIDS

Picture of Nalea J. Ko

It’s been over six months since I began the California Endowment Health Journalism Fellowship, and now here I am writing my final blog.

Picture of Leiloni  De Gruy

For people living with HIV or AIDS, nutrition is a key component of any treatment plan. With a weakened immune system, it is vital that they maintain optimum health by way of exercise and following the basics set forth in widely-accepted dietary guidelines. But living in neighborhoods where healthy food options are few and far between, with an outsize presence of fast-food outlets, can make it difficult to eat healthy.

Picture of Leiloni  De Gruy

Living with HIV or AIDS can be an unyielding source of stress that is not easily handled alone. It takes support, activism and a strong determination to not only survive, but thrive with a disease that takes a heavy mental, physical and emotional toll.

Picture of Leiloni  De Gruy

When HIV/AIDS was thought of as a White, gay disease, it was often the suffering of Black patients that helped the world realize that it could affect anyone. Today, African-Americans remain the racial group most acutely affected by the epidemic.

Picture of Nalea J. Ko

The Asian Pacific American community includes more than 100 languages/dialects and some 45 different ethnic subgroups, complicating the prevention and treatment of HIV/AIDS.

Picture of Nathanael Johnson

AIDS in Cuba, the costs and benefits of HSAs, long-term care insurance, and more from our Daily Briefing.

Picture of Leiloni  De Gruy

For people living with HIV or AIDS, nutrition is a key component of any treatment plan. But living in neighborhoods where healthy food options are few and far between can make it difficult to eat healthy.

Picture of Katja Heinemann

By 2015 more than half of all people living with HIV in the US will be over 50.

Picture of Barbara Feder Ostrov

Mad cows, Medicaid cost-cutting, juking the stats on veterans' mental health care and more from our Daily Briefing.

Picture of Kate  Benson

In an era of “modern” medicine, it sometimes seems as if many of the biggies have been knocked out compared to centuries past. The previously untreatable has become treatable and in many cases preventable. With knowledge can come lower societal costs as well as health care cost containment.

Pages

Announcements

The pandemic is far from over but crucial COVID-19 protections and benefits are gone. In our next webinar, we'll explore the end of renter protections, unemployment benefits and other emergency relief, and what it means for the nation’s pandemic recovery and the health and well-being of low-income people and their communities. Glean story ideas and crucial context. Sign-up here!

Are you passionate about helping journalists understand and illuminate the social factors that contribute to health and health disparities at a time when COVID-19 has highlighted the costs of such inequities? Looking to play a big role in shaping journalism today in the United States?  Apply now for one of our positions. 

CONNECT WITH THE COMMUNITY

Follow Us

Facebook


Twitter

CHJ Icon
ReportingHealth