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Alaska

Picture of Yereth Rosen
The 1918 influenza epidemic is still remembered keenly in parts of rural Alaska.
Picture of Yereth Rosen
It includes $230 million for an EPA water grant program in Alaska, as well as money for climate resilience — some of which is designated for community relocation.
Picture of Yereth Rosen
The bipartisan infrastructure bill that passed the U.S. Senate includes $3.5 billion for water and sanitation, some of which will go to rural Alaska villages.
Picture of Claire Stremple
How do you find sources that live in hard-to-reach places in the middle of a pandemic?
Picture of Mary Pember

Desperate to stem the recent spate of youth suicides in their community, residents of South Dakota's Pine Ridge Indian Reservation have turned to an unlikely ally — crowdfunding.

Picture of Joaqlin Estus

In communities without running water and flush toilets, 11 times more children develop pneumonia than other Alaskans, and some develop complications that can lead to lifelong respiratory problems.

Picture of Joaqlin Estus

What if you didn’t have piped water and sewer, and the government wasn’t picking up the tab to extend such resources to you in rural Alaska? How would you go about finding a low-cost system that you could keep running through the winter?

Picture of Joaqlin Estus

Even rural Alaskan communities that have raised the money to build modern sanitation systems face the threat of their ultimate failure due to the lack of funding for operations and maintenance, wiping away whatever health gains were achieved.

Picture of Joaqlin Estus

In her Kick the Bucket series, Joaqlin Estus tells the stories of rural Alaskans who are just getting used to modern plumbing, as well as others who are still waiting for running water.

Picture of Marc Lester

Every day, outreach workers try to lift homeless alcoholics from the streets of Anchorage, Alaska. In the past, a sober life has always been the goal. But a controversial approach called Housing First is challenging that thinking. Last story in a four-part series.

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“Racism in medicine is a national emergency.” That’s how journalist Nicholas St. Fleur characterized the crisis facing American health care this spring, as his team at STAT embarked on “Color Code,” an eight-episode series exploring medical mistrust in communities of color across the country. In this webinar, we’ll take inspiration from their work to discuss strategies and examples for telling stories about inequities, disparities and racism in health care systems. Sign-up here!

The USC Center for Health Journalism at the Annenberg School for Communication and Journalism is seeking two Engagement Editors to serve as thought leaders in one of the most innovative and rewarding arenas in journalism today – “engaged reporting” that puts the community at the center of the reporting process. Learn more about the positions and apply to join our team.

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