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Alaska

Picture of Bill Graves

About 70 percent of the state’s more than 50,000 Native Americans live in Multnomah County, home to Oregon’s largest city, Portland, and have rates of health problems from infant mortality to AIDS that far exceed the general population.

Picture of Lisa Jones

Journalist Lisa Jones muses on covering Native American health issues and remembers her friend Stanford Addison.

Picture of William Heisel

Every time Public Citizen ranks state medical boards for their effectiveness, some official will say that it is an unfair assessment because state boards all work differently in overseeing doctors. This is partly true — and it is also part of the problem.

 

Picture of Mary Pember

The National Library of Medicine plans an exhibit of Native American healing practices this fall. In preparation, its physician-director met and questioned nine renowned Indian medicine men in Bismark, ND, a rare encounter.

Picture of Carol Smith

Studies show that residents living in neighborhoods near the Dumawish River are highly susceptible to illness and lower life expectancy, especially compared to those living in other areas of King County.

Picture of Carol Smith

Environmental justice is an old mandate getting a new life under Lisa Jackson, the first African-American head of the Environmental Protection Agency.

Picture of Noelle  Robbins

In an effort to promote awareness of the relationship between healthy forests, healthy people and healthy economies, The UN has declared 2011 the International Year of Forests. One overlooked reality links healthy forests, healthy people and improved global sanitation: the production and use of toilet paper, from forest to flush.

 

Picture of William Heisel

Although Doctors Behaving Badly tends to focus on exactly what you would expect, its mission is to make people aware of the many ways that patients are left unprotected.

There are nearly 1 million licensed, practicing physicians nationwide. Antidote has no ability to count how many are “behaving badly,” but it is safe to say that only a slim minority are tainting the reputation of the medical community. Doctors who abuse, injure or kill patients are the surrogate markers for an illness in the physician discipline system. They are not the illness.

Picture of William Heisel

Medical boards from coast to coast are inconsistent, inefficient and ill equipped to monitor the hundreds of thousands of doctors licensed under their watch, Antidote’s investigation of every state board has found. There are some standouts, but, overall, they do a terrible job protecting patients and informing the public.

It bears repeating that most doctors do a great job and are focused on one thing: helping their patients heal and lead healthier lives. The mission of this tour was to explore what happens to that minority of doctors who don’t follow the rules.

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Nowhere was the massive COVID wave of winter 2021 more devastating than in America’s nursing homes, where 71,000 residents died in the surge. In this webinar, we’ll hear from the lead reporter in the USA Today series "Dying for Care," who will show how an original data analysis and an exhaustive reporting effort revealed a pattern of unnecessary deaths that compounded the pandemic’s brutal toll. Sign-up here!

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