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alcohol abuse

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This story was produced as part of a larger project led by Deidre McPhillips, a participant in the USC Center for Health Journalism's 2018 Data Fellowship. Other stories in this series include:
Picture of Monya De

As any ER doc can tell you, alcohol can lead to all kinds of horrible and entirely preventable health effects. So why not jump on the "dry January" trend? As Dr. Monya De writes, drinkers who do so are more likely to use less alcohol going forward.

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Psychiatrist Omar Manejwala shares his expertise on addiction and compulsive behaviors and why recovery from cravings is mostly about what you start doing, and much less about what you stop doing.

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The most exciting exchange erupting on Twitter last week wasn’t about Kony 2012. Or Nandito Ako. It was about NNT — number needed to treat.

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Alcoholism forced 20-year-old Amy to move away from Santa Barbara and everything she knew. She had begun drinking at age 16 and a pattern of dependence started soon after, forcing her into a succession of rehabilitation facilities before she moved to Oklahoma in an attempt to break the cycle.

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Lori McComas Chaffins spent a decade battling an addiction to alcohol and prescription drugs before she decided to change her life.

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The issue of homeless people drinking themselves to death on a sidewalk is one that unites and divides communities in unpredictable ways. Could a "wet house" be the answer in your city?

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The National Library of Medicine plans an exhibit of Native American healing practices this fall. In preparation, its physician-director met and questioned nine renowned Indian medicine men in Bismark, ND, a rare encounter.

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Joel Aguilar has never been a gang member, but has three bullets in him nonetheless. The east Salinas teenager is largely paralyzed: He can move his neck, raise both his arms a few inches and move one wrist — the physical toll of a "gang-related" shooting that nearly killed him two years ago. Kimber Solana examines the psychological impact of gang violence on both victims and the community.

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