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Alzheimer's disease

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The fourth and last in a series of articles on the impact of Alzheimer’s disease on the Black community in Los Angeles.
Picture of Darlene Donloe
Aducanumab is the first new drug approved to treat Alzheimer’s disease in nearly 20 years. But some in the medical community were stunned by the approval.
Picture of Darlene Donloe
“We are still trying to understand how it manifests and how it happens,” said Dr. Emnet Gammada, a clinical geriatric neuro-psychology fellow at the UCLA Semel Institute of Neuroscience and Human Behavior. “What surprises me is how much we know and how much we don’t know.”
Picture of Darlene Donloe
This is the second in a series of articles produced by Darlene Donloe, a 2021 California Fellow, on the impact of Alzheimer’s disease on the Black community in Los Angeles.
Picture of Julia Sclafani
In Orange County, older adults die of Alzheimer’s disease at a higher rate than their peers in most of the country — it’s the third leading cause of death for the group, compared to the sixth nationwide.
Picture of Frank Gluck

Reporter Frank Gluck recently spent five months reporting on how Alzheimer’s disease has affected Southwest Florida, where the population of seniors is twice the national average. Here he shares some essential reporting lessons and tips for others tackling the topic in their region.

Picture of Frank Gluck

Alzheimer's disease, the most common form of dementia, is hitting older communities such as Southwest Florida hard, overwhelming retirement savings and loading more costs onto the region's already strained medical system, a five-month News-Press investigation found.

Picture of Frank Gluck

Experts estimate that as many as 55,000 Southwest Floridians have diagnosed or undiagnosed Alzheimer's disease. To better understand the disease's impact on the region, The News-Press in Fort Myers, Florida, interviewed experts on the disease and families now coping with it.

Picture of Susan Gilbert

A death notice in The New York Times last week caught the eye of one of my colleagues, who circulated it around the office. It was for an emerita professor of psychology at Cornell who committed suicide after receiving an Alzheimer’s diagnosis. Are there more such death notices to come?

Picture of William Heisel

New research suggests Alzheimer's disease is responsible for far more deaths than has been reported. The finding has major implications for health policy and research.

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