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American Heart Association

Picture of Parimal Rohit

India-West’s examination of the impact of diabetes within the Indian population continues with a look at an attempt to legislate efforts to reduce sugar consumption, how one diabetic patient lived with the disease for nearly 25 years, and ways to manage the chronic condition.

Picture of Martha Rosenberg

The American Heart Association (AHA) and the American College of Cardiology (ACC) recently released new cardiovascular disease prevention guidelines. They are an egregious example of much that is wrong with medicine today.

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Annually, Medicare pays about $6 million for telehealth services, according to the IOM. In comparison, Medicare paid over $3 billion to providers participating in Electronic Health Record incentive programs from 2011 to 2012.

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Even with major initiatives from such high-profile entities as the NFL and First Lady Michelle Obama pounding the message of exercising and healthy eating, childhood obesity in the U.S shows few signs of abating. Could more influential policy be the answer?

Picture of Gary Schwitzer

Evidence is piling up about the low percentage of papers presented at scientific meetings that are ever published. So why do so many journalists continue to treat such papers as if they were sacrosanct? News coverage of the recent American Heart Association's scientific sessions is a case in point.

Picture of William Heisel

Saying someone died of a stroke is only a little more specific than saying that they died from old age. Here's what you need to know.

Picture of Nathanael Johnson

A million-dollar prostate, new revelations on breast cancer, the link (or lack thereof) between gum disease and heart attacks, problems with biotech crops and more from our Daily Briefing.

Picture of Kate Long

In 2005, almost four out of 10 kids in the Kearney, Neb., schools were obese or overweight. Five years later, Kearney had chopped the obesity rate of their grade school kids by a stunning 13 percent.

Picture of Kate Long

One in four fifth-graders has high blood pressure and cholesterol. One in four eleven-year-olds is obese, a clear red flag for the future.

Picture of Barbara Feder Ostrov

Go beyond event listings and corporate tie-ins to do substantial reporting on women's heart health this month. Here are some ideas to get you started.

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Announcements

This month marks the sober anniversary of the police killing of George Floyd, which ignited global protests and renewed efforts to reform or dismantle policing. In our next webinar, we’ll examine the price society pays for a criminal-legal system that disproportionately arrests, punishes and kills Black people. And we’ll look at how reporters can best cover this evolving story in original and powerful ways. Sign-up here!

As public health officials like to say, "COVID-19 isn't done with us." And journalists know that we're not done with COVID-19. Apply now for five days of stimulating discussions on the pandemic's disproportionate impact on people of color -- plus reporting and engagement grants of $2k-$10k and five months of mentoring while you work on an ambitious project.

Are you passionate about helping journalists understand and illuminate the social factors that contribute to health and health disparities at a time when COVID-19 has highlighted the costs of such inequities? Looking to play a big role in shaping journalism today in the United States? The USC Center for Health Journalism seeks an enterprising and experienced journalism leader for our new position of “Manager of Projects.” 

 

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