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American Medical Association

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Is Oklahoma headed toward a crisis in access to health care? Health experts say yes -- for many reasons. This three-part series takes a look at the problems, how it affects all Oklahomans and what can be done to change it.

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Kansas City Star reporter Alan Bavley was just doing his job. In response to his watchdog stories on medical malpractice, federal officials yanked public portions of a national doctor database offline and threatened him with fines. Now, journalists are pushing back.

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When Dow Jones & Co., publisher of The Wall Street Journal, announced it was suing to gain access to information about individual providers in the Medicare claims database, investigative reporters everywhere started salivating.

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How did William Hamman, the United Airlines pilot who faked being a cardiologist, get away with it? By speaking with authority and knowing that nobody was going to bother to fact-check his résumé, including the Wisconsin Medical Examining Board.

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Elizabeth A. Bancroft, M.D., S.M., has been a medical epidemiologist in the Acute Communicable Disease Control Program of the Los Angeles County Department of Public Health since August 2001. Since 2003, she has gained national media attention because of her work on communityassociated MRSA. This attention was magnified in fall 2007 with her editorial on MRSA in the Journal of the American Medical Association. Dr. Bancroft is chief of the county department's invasive bacterialdisease, hepatitis, and antimicrobial resistance unit.

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It's all hospitals and doctors in today's Daily Briefing:

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Dr. Catherine DeAngelis, editor-in-chief of the Journal of the American Medical Association, made some bold statements at last week’s Association of Health Care Journalists conference in Chicago.

“I usually talk about conflict of interest wearing a flak jacket,” DeAngelis said and proceeded to list all the ways she has gotten tough on authors with ties to the drug or device industries.

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The annual Association of Health Care Journalists conference has become indispensable in a way conferences never are.

Far from just an excuse to see old friends and drink too much, the AHCJ conference is always so packed with great speakers and workshops that writers find themselves wishing for a baby monitor they could set up in one session while they attend a different session down the hall.

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Primary care may give way to specialization

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The USC Center for Health Journalism at the Annenberg School for Communication and Journalism is seeking two Engagement Editors to serve as thought leaders in one of the most innovative and rewarding arenas in journalism today – “engaged reporting” that puts the community at the center of the reporting process. Learn more about the positions and apply to join our team.

Nowhere was the massive COVID wave of winter 2021 more devastating than in America’s nursing homes, where 71,000 residents died in the surge. In this webinar, we’ll hear from the lead reporter in the USA Today series "Dying for Care," who will show how an original data analysis and an exhaustive reporting effort revealed a pattern of unnecessary deaths that compounded the pandemic’s brutal toll. Sign-up here!

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