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In June 2002, Dr. David F. Archer had a paper published under his name that reassured women everywhere that they could take antibiotics and birth control pills at the same time and not worry about pregnancy. The article was music to the ears of executives at Wyeth, the drug company giant.

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HYDERABAD SINDH: Every year 0.4 million children died in Pakistan during or after birth. Most of them can't celebrate their 1st birth day, among them 80,000 thousand died due to Pneumonia, which is the leading cause death. Dr. Salma sheikh, Director Mother & Child Division Liaquat University of Medical and Health science in Press conference at Hyderabad press club.

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Drug companies are looking outside their own labs for new products

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Kelley Weiss, a health care reporter at Capital Public Radio in Sacramento, is one of this year's California Broadcast fellows. For her report, L.A. Takes On Prescription Drug Swaps, she reported on a thriving black market for prescription drugs from abroad and accompanied a team from the multi-department Health Authority Law Enforcement (HALT) Task Force to collect illegal pharmaceuticals.

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We all know it's important to put on UV protection before heading outdoors, but the chemicals in your sun block could be doing your skin more harm than good.

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John Carey, a 20-year veteran at BusinessWeek, wrote a story that set the pharmaceutical world on its ear in January 2008. Titled "Do Cholesterol Drugs Do Any Good?," the article systematically broke down the many myths behind the so-called "miracle cure" for heart disease: statins. Carey's story won an award from the Association of Health Care Journalists at its conference in Seattle.

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With the rise in MRSA  and other antibiotic-resistant infections, the few that prove dangerous or deadly invariably make headlines or lead the evening news. Because even basic reporting can stir panic each time a cluster of infections arises, here are tips on presenting these stories with context and perspective.

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MRSA, otherwise known as the "Superbug," often sends the media into frenzy, particularly when a person contracts it in a locker room or a college dorm and dies. There are two types, community-associated and health-care-associated, and they are often confused. Community-based infections account for few deaths or serious disabilities, yet receive most of the media's attention. Health-care-associated infections accounted for 85 percent of the reported cases and almost 18,000 deaths in 2005, according to a Centers for Disease Control and Prevention estimate released in 2007.

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