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Picture of Martha Escudero
Martha Escudero draws on her own experience of severe depression and grinding poverty as she makes home visits to at-risk mothers in East Los Angeles, offering what help she can.
Picture of Jenny Manrique
Once used almost solely to treat post traumatic stress in war veterans, EMDR has slowly become an effective therapy to treat a range of traumas, including those experienced by immigrants.
Picture of Suzanne Hurt
For the survivors of the San Bernardino terrorist attack, the battle to get the health care they need continues. And the county's broken workers' compensation system is only making matters worse.
Picture of Gisela Telis
This story was reported as a project for USC Annenberg's Center for Health Journalism National Fellowship. 
Picture of Ryan Burns
“Who has seen a behavioral counselor?” Roughly half of the kids at the Yurok Tribe's youth wellness event stepped forward. “Who has suffered from depression or anxiety?” Three-quarters of the kids came forward.
Picture of Angela Naso
Luis Nolasco, 25, did not know what the psychological consequences would be when he came from Mexico with his family, illegally, at the age of nine. Then, in his late teens, he noticed he began to feel sad and pessimistic.
Picture of Jeffrey Hess
“I call it present traumatic stress disorder. When you have post-traumatic stress disorder it means the trauma has ended. With our people it is a perpetual trauma that is inflicted on almost a daily basis,” one lifelong resident of Bakersfield says.
Picture of Angela Naso
Three out of four adults of Mexican origin who experience a mental illness will not seek professional help, and the problem of under utilization is even higher among Mexican immigrants.
Picture of Jondi Gumz

When Tim Fitzmaurice lost his wife Ginny, his partner of 44 years, to dementia in 2014, his experience as her caregiver brought him so much pain and guilt that he kept it to himself. Until Tuesday, when he asked Santa Cruz County health staff to reach out to families dealing with dementia.

Picture of Monya De

Why is mental health so walled off from the rest of the health care system, even when statistics show that 18 percent of all adults have some kind of mental illness? And weren't federal parity requirements supposed to fix this?

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