Skip to main content.

Arizona

Picture of Rochelle Sharpe

An iWatch News investigation documents $1.9 billion in wasted federal health care expenditures.

Picture of Barbara Feder Ostrov

Medicaid woes in California, a better, but costly, lung cancer screening tool, health reform's unintended consequences and more from our Daily Briefing.

Picture of Hillary Meeks

To encourage more doctors to work in underserved areas, state Assemblyman Henry Perea, D-Fresno, proposed a bill for the Steven M. Thompson Medical School Scholarship Program to help students pay for medical school. The bill, Assembly Bill 589, has a condition: The students contractually commit to work their first three years after residency in an underserved area.

Picture of Hillary Meeks

A look into why Tulare County, a poor, semi-rural county in California's Central Valley, has a severe lack of physicians.

Picture of Sarah Arnquist

After nearly a decade of deficit, French Hospital Medical Center is finally on the financial mend. Back on its feet, the center is making ambitious expansion plans for its future.

Picture of Pedro Frisneda

"It's the alcohol hangover," Gerardo Cuapio thought five years ago when he woke up thirsty and with blurred vision. National Health Journalism Fellow Pedro Frisneda tells the story of a man who was on the verge of death without knowing he had Type 2 diabetes. It's a cautionary tale for what happens to many Latin American immigrants who move to the United States, adopting a new lifestyle and diet that can contribute to developing the disease. "The Big Apple is confronting one of the worst diabetes epidemics in the nation and health authorities have declared it an emergency," with Hispanics suffering disproportionately.

This story was originally published in Spanish. Below is the English translation.

Part 2: In the kingdom of fats and sugar

Part 3: In a sedentary country

Picture of Barbara Feder Ostrov

Forty states get an "F" for their tobacco prevention programs, plus more from today's Daily Briefing.

Picture of Alison Knezevich

Prescription drug abuse is growing nationwide, but West Virginia was one of the first places hit by the problem. When I picked this topic, I didn't realize how complex it was. The drugs are widely available. Doctors are struggling to treat pain with effective medications without supplying drug abusers. And prescription drug crimes have proven difficult to prosecute.

This is the second in a four-part series examining prescription drug abuse in West Virginia.

 

Picture of Barbara Feder Ostrov

Did Arizona's mental health system fail alleged Tucson shooter Jared Loughner? Plus more from our Daily Briefing.

Picture of Barbara Feder Ostrov

In the wake of Rep. Gabrielle Giffords' recovery, attention turns to traumatic brain injuries. Plus more from our Daily Briefing.

Pages

CONNECT WITH THE COMMUNITY

Follow Us

Facebook


Twitter

CHJ Icon
ReportingHealth