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William C. Knowler is chief of the Diabetes Epidemiology and Clinical Research Section in the Division of Intramural Research at the National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases. The Institute has primary responsibility for diabetes research at the National Institutes of Health. For more than three decades, Dr. Knowler has conducted research on diabetes in the Gila River Indian Community in Arizona, looking for insights into the genetic and environmental factors that lead to the development of Type 2 diabetes.

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Southern Arizona children are suffering from adult afflictions — and doctors blame it on a troubling surge in childhood obesity.

In Arizona 31 percent of children between the ages of 10 and 17 are overweight or obese, experts say.

Lifestyle, diet and genetics play a role, but the biggest common denominator among them is socioeconomic.

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Southern Arizona children are suffering from adult afflictions — and doctors blame it on a troubling surge in childhood obesity.

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Nearly half a million Texans live in substandard conditions in colonias —2,300 unincorporated and isolated border towns with limited access to potable water, sewer systems, electricity, sanitary housing or health care. These predominantly Hispanic, overwhelmingly impoverished villages, which dot the 1,248-mile Texas-Mexico border from the Gulf of Mexico to El Paso, present a state public health nightmare. But despite decades of public outcry, campaign promises and legislative action, conditions in the colonias have improved relatively little. Using the Dennis A.

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Who hasn’t come home from work with a company pen in their pocket? Used the work printer for directions to a restaurant on a Friday afternoon? Answered a call from their mom on the company cell phone?

In that spirit, we could consider Dr. Duane Stillions just one of the rest of us.

If only he weren’t a children’s physician with a drug habit.

Stillions, a 42-year-old anesthesiologist, was caught in May 2009 by Children’s National Medical Center in Washington DC taking painkillers that were meant for kids undergoing surgery.

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One doctor allowed her clinics in Santa Ana, California, to be used as front operations for selling highly addictive painkillers.

Another doctor agreed to be paid $2,000 a month for the use of his registration with the DEA so that the front operations could keep up their supply.

Another doctor was willing to rent his registration for half that.

All of them were caught red-handed by the U.S. Drug Enforcement Agency. Medical Board of California investigations are not made public, but, so far, none of them have been disciplined in California.

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Here's something a doctor should hope to never hear after performing surgery:

"Doc, my eye feels like mayonnaise."

That was the assessment of an 81-year-old patient operated on by Dr. Gary W. Hall, a Phoenix ophthalmologist.

The patient had cataracts in both eyes, but her vis

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It’s safe to say that most health writers pay attention when Tracy Weber and Charlie Ornstein publish something.

They have been called the Woodward and Bernstein of health reporting. The comparison fits because these two have few peers in their ability to dig for documents, cajole sources into talking and embarrass powerful public figures.

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Dr. Patrick Dean has pulled off a magic trick to make Houdini proud.

The founder and president of GI Pathology, a national testing laboratory based in Memphis, Dean has practiced medicine without a license in at least two states. Practicing without a license is often a career killer for a physician. Not so with Dean.

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The National Health Journalism seminar begins on Sunday, when 15 National Health Journalism fellowship recipients (and five Dennis A.

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