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Arkansas

Picture of Ginny Monk
Kids need help, frank talk, experts say.
Picture of Ginny Monk
Arkansas has a child mortality rate far higher than the national average. Is the state doing enough to prevent these deaths?
Picture of Amanda Curcio
A youth lockup in southeast Arkansas closed its doors Thursday, making it the second such state facility to shutter since the start of the year.
Picture of Amanda Curcio
Support for Curcio’s reporting on this project also came from the Fund for Journalism on Child Well-Being, a program of the USC Annenberg Center for Health Journalism at the University of Southern California. Other stories in this series include:
Picture of Amanda Curcio
Support for Curcio’s reporting on this project also came from the Fund for Journalism on Child Well-Being, a program of the USC Annenberg Center for Health Journalism at the University of Southern California. Other stories in this series include:
Picture of Amanda Curcio
Support for Curcio’s reporting on this project also came from the Fund for Journalism on Child Well-Being, a program of the USC Annenberg Center for Health Journalism at the University of Southern California. Other stories in this series include:
Picture of Amanda Curcio
Support for Curcio’s reporting on this project also came from the Fund for Journalism on Child Well-Being, a program of the USC Annenberg Center for Health Journalism at the University of Southern California.
Picture of Amanda Curcio
Support for Curcio’s reporting on this project also came from the Fund for Journalism on Child Well-Being, a program of the USC Annenberg Center for Health Journalism at the University of Southern California.
Picture of Amanda Curcio
Soon, Arkansas won’t jail kids for longer than six months, in most cases, state officials said Friday.
Picture of Trudy  Lieberman
A regional outlet and a national broadcast tell the stories of those kicked off Medicaid in Arkansas due to new work rules with two incisive reports, published the same day.

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