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Arkansas

Picture of Trudy  Lieberman
A regional outlet and a national broadcast tell the stories of those kicked off Medicaid in Arkansas due to new work rules with two incisive reports, published the same day.
Picture of Amanda Curcio
Hundreds of Arkansas children are thrown behind bars every year. Most haven’t committed a violent crime. Worse, the conditions they face in detention are abysmal.
Picture of Kellie  Schmitt
“I do think you should take the arguments in favor of work requirements seriously,” Vox's Dylan Scott advised. “But also, of course, look at them with a skeptical eye.”
Picture of Chad Day

How one reporter overcame closed courts and bad data to get the scoop on Arkansas' juvenile justice system, where minor offenses can result in children locked up with far more serious offenders.

Picture of Chad Day

In roughly two-thirds of Arkansas counties last year, children went to youth lockups for skipping school, disobeying their parents or running away from home. In the other 27 counties, children who did the same things remained free.

Picture of Jason Kane

In Arkansas, an alternative to the Affordable Care Act’s Medicaid expansion uses federal dollars to purchase private health plans for low-income residents who fall in a coverage gap. But now, as other states consider following suit, the Arkansas law, could end unless it is renewed by lawmakers.

Picture of Liz Borkowski

President Johnson may not have intended to sign the Freedom of Information Act on Independence Day, but July 4th is a fitting birthday for FOIA.

Picture of Ken Reibel

Has autism always been with us at the numbers we see today, or is there actually more of it? It’s a complicated question, but the organization Autism Speaks is confusing the issue.

Picture of William Heisel

What does it take for a doctor to lose his license in Arkansas?

Dr. Randeep Singh Mann appears to have pushed the envelope just about as far as it can go, and he is still holding an active medical license from that state.

Mann, an internist in Russellville, is accused of attacking the head of the Arkansas State Medical Board by planting a bomb in his driveway.

Picture of William Heisel

UPDATE: Rutland will be allowed to continue practicing but cannot perform surgeries or deliveries after a judge's Jan. 7 decision. Here's the Orange County Register story.

 

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