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asthma

Picture of Angela Hart

In California's Sonoma County, some families face living conditions that include high levels of dangerous mold and other asthma triggers. When landlords don't act, problems can fester for years, leading to a host of health problems.

Picture of Angela Hart

The effect of squalid housing on people’s health is difficult to determine in California's Sonoma County, since there is no study, stockpile of data or government agency that tracks illness in connection with living environments.

Picture of Ryan White

Dateline NBC recently examined why families in poorer zip codes in places such as New York City are hit far harder by asthma than upper income children. A big part of the problem is public housing.

Picture of Jill  Braden Balderas

Looking for fresh story ideas? We hope these accounts of how reporters across the country got the stories, sources and subjects give you fodder for covering your own communities in a new way.

Picture of David Danelski

Moreno Valley, city staff members are processing plans by a local developer to build a warehousing hub covering the equivalent of 700 football fields. Its a testing ground in the struggle to balance the need for jobs and the imperative for clean air.

Picture of Ryan White

What is the latest science telling us about the potential health consequences of breathing contaminated air?

Picture of Ryan White

Southern California’s The Press-Enterprise newspaper recently published an extensively reported, in-depth look at air pollution in the Inland Empire and invited community members to a discussion about ways to improve the situation.

Picture of David Danelski

The Golden State's air quality has improved dramatically since the 1970s, but still, on more than 100 days a year, Southern California is failing to meet clean air standards. Children appear to suffer the most with pollution laying the groundwork for multiple health problems.

Picture of William Heisel

Center for Health Journalism Digital's "Health and the Built Environment Webinar: What Makes a Healthy Environment?" offered ideas for journalists to cover this important issue, which when left unaddressed by the medical community can add significantly to medical costs and patient morbidity.

Picture of William Heisel

If your main sources on the health beat are physicians, you’re not doing your job. That became clear over the course of Health and the Built Environment Webinar: What Makes a Healthy Environment?, presented by Center for Health Journalism Digital this week.

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