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asthma

Picture of Linda Marsa

People who live in the country's industrial zones and experience its pollution already feel the effects of what a hotter planet will bring as carbon levels climb and air quality steadily worsens, resulting in higher rates of asthma, allergies, respiratory ills and even heart disease.

Picture of Taunya English

In-home upgrades are supposed to help kids avoid asthma attacks, missed school days and visits to the emergency room.

Picture of Amanda Mascarelli

Researchers are growing increasingly aware that the prenatal period and early childhood are exquisitely sensitive to external insults such as environmental contaminants.

Picture of Linda Marsa

Much has been written about the overall impacts of climate change. Still, there is a big chunk of the story that’s under-reported: how will it impact our health.

Picture of Susan  Abram

Outreach workers from health clinics have spent the last three years in search of 390,000 Los Angeles County residents who are uninsured and can qualify for free health insurance.

Picture of Alison Yin

Photographer and multimedia journalist Alison Yin, a 2012 National Health Journalism Fellow, shares how she chronicled the “invisible” struggles of children with asthma through photos and audio.

Picture of Katy  Murphy

Asthma is the most common cause of hospital stays for children. It can strike anyone, but has a disproportionate impact on low-income and African-American children. Katy Murphy, a 2012 National Health Journalism Fellow, shares lessons learned from her Fellowship project for the Oakland Tribune

Picture of Elaine Korry

The Affordable Care Act establishes national standards for health insurance benefits. Should the standards be different for children than for adults? Here are the lessons that 2012 National Health Journalism Fellow Elaine Korry learned during her reporting for The California Report.

Picture of Katy  Murphy

The Breathmobile, an asthma clinic on wheels, helps hundreds of California schoolchildren receive the help they need to stave off trips to the hospital.

Picture of Katy  Murphy

In high school, Pamela Tapia spent more time at home with her inhaler than at school with her teachers. Now that she has moved just a few miles away from the poor air quality in West Oakland, for the first time in four years, she celebrated an asthma-free birthday.

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