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Picture of Betsy  Cliff

Each year thousands of patients are harmed by medical care in Oregon. A Bend woman, Mary Parker, was one.

Picture of Gergana Koleva

A first-of-its-kind class action lawsuit filed against a New York dentist is bringing to light a dubious tactic some medical doctors employ to protect their reputations.

Picture of William Heisel

Texas sheriff Robert Roberts and doctor Rolando Arafiles, accused of intimidating whistleblower nurses, get their day in court - while Arafiles has found another hospital job despite the controversy.

Picture of Bob Butler

Devaugndre Broussard grew up in three violent neighborhoods: San Francisco's Bayview-Hunter's Point and Western Addition and Richmond's Iron Triangle. His mother went to prison for drug sales when he was only 10 months old. She went back to prison several times while he grew up, sending him to a series of foster homes. A girlfriend who attended some of Broussard's early court appearances told the Chauncey Bailey Project this might've set the tone for his life. He's one of many people she knows who lived in foster homes where "parents" were more interested in the monthly county check than in their foster kids.

Picture of William Heisel

Before he was busted for prescribing drugs over the Internet, Dr. Stephen Hollis wrote 43,930 prescriptions for drugs in just one year, about about 170 scrips every workday. How is that even possible? Hollis tells me how.

Picture of William Heisel

After being busted for dispensing prescriptions over the Internet and providing poor medical care to his patients, Dr. Stephen Hollis says he still maintains a thriving eye surgery practice. He talks about his past and present in a surprisingly candid interview.

Picture of William Heisel

A doctor busted for prescribing drugs for an Internet pharmacy talks about how and why he did it.

Picture of Anna Clark

Attorney General Eric Holder's weakened plan to stop rape in prison disappoints advocates.

Picture of Alison Knezevich

When I set out to produce my fellowship series on prescription drug abuse in West Virginia, I already knew some grim statistics. Residents here are more likely than those of any other state to die of a prescription overdose. Because of high rates of chronic disease and occupational injuries, people in West Virginia also fill more prescriptions per capita than anywhere else.

Picture of William Heisel

It’s doubtful that so many health journalists would have covered the case of the late Dr. Mel Levine if he had not appeared on Oprah.

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