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There are a lot of ways to work in health news and information beyond general interest journalism. Learn about a career in medical copy-editing from Katharine O'Moore-Klopf, who has been helping medical professionals and researchers write about their work for 16 years. 

Picture of Maureen OHagan

For a decade, Washington has been fighting for your life. Yet you might not even know this because it's been a quiet battle, a fight designed to work its way into the fabric of your life. It's about your weight — or, more important, the weight of your children.

Picture of Barbara Feder Ostrov

The long-awaited Federal Communications Commission report on American journalism, Information Needs of Communities, paints a poignant picture of the decline of health journalism at the nation’s newspapers.

Picture of Michelle Levander

Susan Mernit and Staci Baird, social media gurus, had a message for reformed journalists and New Media entrepreneurs participating in our pilot program melding online community engagement and health journalism: "We come in peace."

Picture of R. Jan Gurley

Many professions have their version of a post-event analysis of what went wrong, and how to prevent it. The autopsy report is medicine's. Journalists can find a trove of stories in a review of death certificates.

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William Heisel interviews health writer Liz Scherer about the latest coverage of the Women's Health Initiative study on hormone replacement therapy and her tips for covering women's health.

Picture of William Heisel

The charade perpetrated by William Hamman, the United Airlines pilot who had a second, lucrative career as a fake cardiologist, is starting to have consequences.

Picture of William Heisel

It makes for a sad spring when I can’t attend the annual Association of Health Care Journalists conference.

Picture of Laurie  Udesky

The nuclear crisis still playing out in Japan may be happening thousands of miles away, but there are numerous relevant stories that health reporters can unearth in the United States that go beyond breaking news.

Picture of William Heisel

Dr. Carl Elliott, a University of Minnesota bioethicist, has spent much of the last two years doggedly pursuing the case of Dan Markingson, a 26-year-old who killed himself during a UM clinical trial meant to prove the superiority of AstraZeneca’s Seroquel over its competitors.

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The nation's top infectious disease specialist will join us for a conversation with national health reporter Dan Diamond of The Washington Post. We’ll talk about the evolving threat posed by monkeypox, the current state of the COVID pandemic, and broader lessons on how we respond to emerging diseases. Sign-up here!

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