Skip to main content.

Baltimore

Picture of Kellie  Schmitt
Only about 6 percent of medical practitioners have obtained a government waiver that allows them to prescribe a crucial drug for treating opioid addiction. Here's why that's a problem.
Picture of Andrea  McDaniels

In Baltimore, violence has marred countless lives. But Baltimore Sun reporter Andrea McDaniels wanted to explore the deeper, long-lasting effects of violence. Her extended reporting crystalized in an award-winning three-part series. Here she shares the challenges she faced and lessons learned.

Picture of Ryan White

“Health care is what happens when things go wrong,” Dr. Anthony Iton says. “Health care doesn’t actually make you healthy — it prevents you from deteriorating rapidly.” The broader forces that really shape health, he argues, are what journalists and policymakers should really be focusing on.

Picture of Andrea  McDaniels

Baltimore is no stranger to violence, but in recent weeks it hit proportions that stunned even a city often numb to regular shootings and stabbings. Violence puts pressure on hospital emergency rooms and paramedics. Many victims don’t die and will stress the entire health system for years to come.

Picture of Mikaela Conley

“HIV is the face of the forgotten people in this country,” Dr. Carlos Del Rio, an Atlanta-based AIDS expert, told me last February. Nevertheless, there continue to be "hot spots” where the disease thrives. Those areas are some of the most impoverished parts of major cities in the U.S.

Picture of Christina Hernandez

Violence-prevention program, Camden GPS Program, helps the city's assault victims.

Picture of Vicky Hallett

None of her yoga-teacher training quite prepared Sariane Leigh for leading her first classes in Washington east of the Anacostia River five years ago.

Picture of Scott Goldberg

Diabetes among African-American adults has reached epidemic proportions. Healthy Bodies, Healthy Souls -- an innovative public health program in Baltimore -- is going after the problem by connecting with people where they pray.

Picture of Gergana Koleva

Sodas, sports drinks, and other sugar-sweetened beverages appear less tempting to consumers when labels show caloric information in terms of minutes of jogging rather than as absolute calorie counts, new research from two leading public health universities suggests.

Picture of Sarah Kliff

If communities build access to healthy foods, will residents come? The evidence is mixed.

Pages

Announcements

The USC Center for Health Journalism's Impact Funds provide reporting support — funding and mentoring — to journalists who think big and want to make a difference. 

Apply today for our National Impact Fund for reporting on health equity and health systems across the country. 

Apply today for our California Impact Fund for reporting that brings untold stories to light in the Golden State. 

CONNECT WITH THE COMMUNITY

Follow Us

Facebook


Twitter

CHJ Icon
ReportingHealth