Skip to main content.

Biology

Picture of Barbara Feder Ostrov

A California HMO dramatically improves blood pressure control, Americans oppose Medicaid overhaul, and an update on kids' access to dental care, plus more from our Daily Briefing.

Picture of Barbara Feder Ostrov

Melatonin brownies, measles on the rise worldwide, and nursing homes that don't want to insurer their employees, plus more in our Daily Briefing.

Picture of Barbara Feder Ostrov

Clean cars could mean less asthma, a link between bedbugs and MRSA, a prescription for yoga and more from our Daily Briefing.

Picture of Anna Clark

An American nonprofit is offering HIV-positive Kenyan women $40 to use IUDs as long-term birth control—and women are taking them up on it. Is this the right way to prevent the transmission of HIV to children?

Picture of Barbara Feder Ostrov

Budget cuts to senior day care programs means many will be forced into expensive nursing homes. Plus more from our Daily Briefing

Picture of Daniela  Velazquez

Daniela Velazquez wades through reams of data on childhood obesity in her community and lives to tell the tale.

Picture of R. Jan Gurley

In today's hyper-evolving social media world, it might seem quaint, if not downright foolish, to believe that old school journalism's low-tech and low-cost approaches — a pen, a pad, and shoe-leather investigation — could result in an article that ignites a global furor.

 

Picture of Barbara Feder Ostrov

Why do Mexican-American schoolchildren in California have seven times more flame retardant in their systems than their peers in Mexico? Answers and more in our Daily Briefing.

Picture of Barbara Feder Ostrov

Consumer genetic tests for kids, problem drinkers and hospital infections, staph bacteria in meat and budget problems ahead for community clinics: all in today's Daily Briefing.

Picture of William Heisel

On Monday, Dr. David C. Martin, a retired Sacramento anesthesiologist, introduced the idea that the public should be on the watch for health care workers wearing hospital scrubs outside of a medical setting, especially in restaurants. Martin's plea for a public health response continues.

Pages

Announcements

The nation’s overdose epidemic has entered a devastating new phase. Drugs laced with fentanyl and even more poisonous synthetics have flooded the streets, as the crisis spreads well beyond the rural, largely white communities that initially drew attention. The death rate is escalating twice as fast among Black people than among white people. This webinar will give journalists deep insights, fresh story ideas and practical tips for covering an epidemic that killed more than 107,000 people in the U.S. last year. Sign-up here!

CONNECT WITH THE COMMUNITY

Follow Us

Facebook


Twitter

CHJ Icon
ReportingHealth