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Here’s the latest in health and health journalism news from Reporting on Health.


Sick Leave:

Could San Francisco’s nationally recognized paid sick leave law extend to the rest of California? Mari Edlin writes about one state lawmaker’s proposal for California Healthline.

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Health reporters got an unusual amount of mileage out of a study that said that its chief finding was “of unknown clinical significance.” And when these same reporters put on their blogging hats, they went off-road entirely.

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Why do two Central California cities top a new "most toxic" cities list? Plus more from our Daily Briefing.

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Today I lectured at the medical school. It is on a hill in a UNICEF tent. It was over 100 degrees in the "test classroom" while I was lecturing. The students took handwritten notes and copied down every word I said.

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In July, I wrote about a “jaw-dropping” press release about California’s astonishing rise in whooping cough cases.

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While speaking at the National Institutes of Health on Tuesday, USAID Administrator Rajiv Shah (left, photo source USAID) told the audience of scientists how the development agency would support the creation of new innovations and their delivery to improve the health of the world’s neediest popul

Picture of Christina Elston

What is air pollution doing to our kids? If you live in L.A. County, and especially if you’ve driven back to the Los Angeles basin from somewhere else, you’ve seen it. A steely brown haze hangs over us for much of the year. We live in the smoggiest region in the United States (according to the South Coast Air Quality Management District), but for those raising children here it may not be top of mind. In some parts of the county, moms claw their way onto waiting lists for the “right” preschool while they are still pregnant. Concerns about finding the right neighborhood, the right school, about keeping kids away from gangs and drugs or getting them to turn off the Xbox and do some homework tend to take center stage. The air we breathe gets plenty of media coverage, but we tend to consider it more of an inconvenience than an emergency.

Yet at every stage of children’s lives – from their time in the womb until they’re ready to leave the nest – the pollution in the air impacts their health. 2010 California Health Journalism Fellow Christina Elston reports.

Picture of Barbara Feder Ostrov

The recent snowpocalypses around the country reminded me that if you haven’t taken a look at what the current flu season is like in your community, it’s a good time to do so. I like how the Miami Herald’s Fred Tasker set the scene for the 2010-2011 in this Q&A piece.

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From the Jonas Brothers to Antonio Banderas, celebrities are cutting deals with Big Pharma. Plus more from our Daily Briefing.

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“Epigenetics is now the hottest thing in biosciences.” 

 

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The nation’s overdose epidemic has entered a devastating new phase. Drugs laced with fentanyl and even more poisonous synthetics have flooded the streets, as the crisis spreads well beyond the rural, largely white communities that initially drew attention. The death rate is escalating twice as fast among Black people than among white people. This webinar will give journalists deep insights, fresh story ideas and practical tips for covering an epidemic that killed more than 107,000 people in the U.S. last year. Sign-up here!

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