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Boston

Picture of Monya De

While innovation will spur many changes in health care, current trends may also create unwelcome developments. Dr. Monya De offers her first five of 10 predictions on what medicine will look like in the decades to come.

Picture of Sue Luttner

The Medill Justice Project has published a thin slice of its data on shaken baby cases, in conjunction with its analysis of how cases are distributed across the country. The view into the database is very narrow, but the county-by-county searches can be fascinating.

Picture of William Heisel

Headed to the Association of Health Care Journalists annual conference this week in Boston? Whatever sessions you attend, have a great time, take lots of notes, and use the experience as inspiration for even better journalism.

Picture of Steven Wilmsen

It’s a neighborhood known for trouble, but the Bowdoin-Geneva area of Boston is much more than that. A Boston Globe team spent a year there, listening and asking why violence persists where love and loyalty also run so strong.

Picture of Martha Rosenberg

The AquAdvantage salmon was created by inserting genetic material from Chinook salmon and ocean pout into wild Atlantic salmon. No wonder it's called a Frankenfish.

Picture of Steven Wilmsen

Urban violence in Boston has generally declined. But the neighborhood called Bowdoin-Geneva for decades has remained a troubled hot spot. Year in and year out, summer brings a rash of shootings – often with tragic results.

Picture of Vicky Hallett

When Redskins tight end Chris Cooley swung by Orr Elementary School in Anacostia last Thursday, he explained to the 100 kids circled around him that he'd already exercised that day. "So hopefully I can keep up with you," he said. Fat chance of that.

Picture of Raquel Orellana

Gainesville is quickly growing into the medical hub of Florida. Check out this week’s featured opportunity to report from an area with three hospitals and several biotech operations.

Picture of Gary Schwitzer

"The renowned mythbuster of medicine" - as one blog calls John Ioannidis, MD, of Stanford - asks tough, important questions about the 100,000+ medical conferences held each year. Journalists and the public should learn from his warnings - since so much news is reported from these meetings.

Picture of Sue Luttner

Debate about a tragic diagnosis polarizes and escalates

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Announcements

“Racism in medicine is a national emergency.” That’s how journalist Nicholas St. Fleur characterized the crisis facing American health care this spring, as his team at STAT embarked on “Color Code,” an eight-episode series exploring medical mistrust in communities of color across the country. In this webinar, we’ll take inspiration from their work to discuss strategies and examples for telling stories about inequities, disparities and racism in health care systems. Sign-up here!

The USC Center for Health Journalism at the Annenberg School for Communication and Journalism is seeking two Engagement Editors to serve as thought leaders in one of the most innovative and rewarding arenas in journalism today – “engaged reporting” that puts the community at the center of the reporting process. Learn more about the positions and apply to join our team.

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