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Bullying

Picture of Beau Yarbrough
In August 2018, three high school students and an elementary school student in Rancho Cucamonga, California killed themselves. I wanted to do more than just report the grim facts of their deaths — but how?
Picture of Deidre McPhillips
An apparent link between risky behavior and bias-related bullying tends to be stronger in California’s more segregated counties.
Picture of Deidre McPhillips
This story was produced as part of a larger project led by Deidre McPhillips, a participant in the USC Center for Health Journalism's 2018 Data Fellowship. Other stories in this series include:
Picture of Rachel  Dissell
This story was produced as part of a larger project led by Rachel Dissell and Brie Zeltner, participants in the 2018 National Fellowship....
Picture of Patricia Wight

In the final installment of Patty Wight's series on poverty and obesity, she looks at the power of social stigma and bias around weight, and the lasting effects they can have on a child.

Picture of Michael LaForgia

To Campbell Park. To Fairmount Park. To Lakewood, Maximo, or Melrose. The five worst elementary schools in Pinellas County­ — all among the very worst schools in Florida — have seats with their name tags on them.

Picture of Michael LaForgia

First the School Board abandoned integration, leaving the schools overwhelmingly poor and black. Then they broke promises to help and stood by and did nothing as black children started failing at outrageous rates.

Picture of Ryan White

The media cycle seems perpetually filled with reports of violence perpetrated against or by young people. But there are some encouraging trends in the data on violence and abuse against young people. Researchers just aren't sure how to explain the gains.

Picture of Ryan White

New research has found that bullies had better health profiles than those not involved in bullying at all, while victims displayed less healthy blood readings over time. The study adds to a growing body of knowledge on how adversity and stress become embedded in our bodies and shape health.

Picture of Karla Escamilla

Our Univision series tells the story of a woman who quietly lived in a very violent relationship. Due to her undocumented status, she feared the authorities, she didn’t know where to find help, and mostly she was threaten to be deported if she said anything about her situation.

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As public health officials like to say, "COVID-19 isn't done with us." And journalists know that we're not done with COVID-19. Apply now for five days of stimulating discussions on the pandemic's disproportionate impact on people of color -- plus reporting and engagement grants of $2k-$10k and five months of mentoring while you work on an ambitious project.

Are you passionate about helping journalists understand and illuminate the social factors that contribute to health and health disparities at a time when COVID-19 has highlighted the costs of such inequities? Looking to play a big role in shaping journalism today in the United States? The USC Center for Health Journalism seeks an enterprising and experienced journalism leader for our new position of “Manager of Projects.” 

 

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