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Picture of Susan  Abram

Hospitals around the country have been increasingly using homeless navigators to help place indigent men and women into treatments centers or housing after discharge, including this first-of-its-kind, two-year-old pilot program from Kaiser Permanente.

Picture of Susan  Abram

Outreach workers from health clinics have spent the last three years in search of 390,000 Los Angeles County residents who are uninsured and can qualify for free health insurance.

Picture of Ryan White

In the richest county in California lies a motley assemblage of residents living aboard a flotilla of weather-worn boats in a narrow bay sandwiched between Sausalito and Tiburon.

Picture of Damien Newton

At the first meeting of my fellow fellows, we were asked a simple question, "do you consider yourself a journalist?" My answer at the time was, "no." My answer today would be different.

Picture of Isabelle Walker

Journalist-blogger Isabelle Walker provides an in-depth look at what happens to homeless people who get seriously ill. Where can they go to recover?

Picture of Mary Otto

Reaching poor people with dental care means unraveling so many other things, including the isolation, difficult living conditions, fear and other burdens of poverty.

Picture of Isabelle Walker

Homeless people who are discharged from acute care hospital to a step-down care center, or medical respite bed, are less likely to be readmitted in 90-days, according to an October, 2009 study in The Journal of Prevention and Intervention in The Community.

Picture of R. Jan Gurley

In California’s largest cities, one senses that the number of homeless people continues to grow, whatever the interventions to prevent it. But some of the more commonly cited reasons for that growth don't explain the whole story.

Picture of R. Jan Gurley

We all live in fear of that moment of diagnosis. You know it's bad, and your brain flees, backing away into a deep, silent corner. Only the words incurable and cancer slither into the darkness where your thoughts are hiding. So what happens that night if you're homeless?

Picture of R. Jan Gurley

You might think that spending ten years on the street, two of them at 6th and Mission, might mean that a person is a hopeless case. If you're thinking that way, even secretly in your mind, as you pass people huddled under urine-soaked gray-felted blankets, then now's the time for you to meet

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